Particle sensor with LoRa

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Mare published a new build:

Particle sensors could be cheap and easy to use. Disadvantage of lowest cost PM sensors is lack of “calibration”. The best method to measure particle content dispensed in the air is to collect the air sample and analyse it off-line in the laboratory with proper equipment (not cheap at all). Optical particle counting sensors use the light scattering method to detect and count particles in the operating concentration range in a given environment. A laser light source illuminates a particle as it is pulled through the detection chamber. As particles pass through the laser beam, the light source becomes obscured and is recorded on the photo or light detector. The light is then analyzed and converted to an electrical signal providing particulate size and quantity to predict concentrations in real time.

See the full post on Mare & Gal Electronics blog.

Energy Meter module to analyze the electrical grid parameters and consumption

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Boris Landoni from Open Electronics writes about a new open source energy meter project:

In the first installment, you had the opportunity of learning about our energy meter, and of learning about its details, with special attention the technical ones. Our energy meter is based on the coupling – by means of two measuring transformers – to an integrated circuit, that enables the detection of the values as for voltage and current, in addition to the corresponding phase angles, so to be able to know the real, the reactive and the apparent power, in addition to the phase angle (cosφ). We developed a software to be paired to our measuring board, so that it may be used for the configuration and calibration of the integrated circuit, and for the real-time display of the electrical measurings that it has carried out.

More details at Open-Electronics.org.  Be sure to see Part 1 here.

Multichannel logic probe and pulsar

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Dilshan Jayakody published a new build:

This is 8 channel CMOS logic probe and pulsar which is useful when designing, testing and faultfinding in digital circuits. This circuit is designed using commonly available CMOS logic ICs which including couple of 4069 hex inverters and 4040 binary counter.
Logic probe of this system is based on 4069 hex inverters and it indicate logic high and low states with 2 LEDs. Logic pulsar of this circuit is capable to generate 12 frequencies and highest frequency it can generate is 420kHz. This pulsar generate square wave with 50% duty cycle and it’s average raise time is 16µS.

See the full post on Dilshan Jayakody’s blog.

Open source Agilent 53132A 53131A OCXO ultra high stability oven upgrade

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Gaurav Singh made an open source 53132A OCXO Ultra stability time base, that is available on github:

While i was working with my own GPSDO project. i need to have a frequency counter with descent stability so purchased my self a Agilent 53132A which is a 12 digit frequency counter, big brother to 53131A 10 Digit Counter. Both are really nice units.
But they unusable standard Timebase. So optional oven oscillator time base need to purchase. but 53132A and 53131A both unit are no longer available for sale and neither of the Time base upgrades.

See the full post on Embedded Engineering blog.

Assembly instructions for the STMBL servo drive

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Andy Pugh wrote a post on his blog detailing STMBL servo drive assembly:

The main documentation (work in progress) is relevant to both the current and future versions of the drive. However due to the withdrawal from the market of the IRAM256 chip used by the board any future versions are likely to be physically different and assembled differently which is why this is a blog post and not a documentation section.

More details on Bodgesoc Blogsoc blog.

App note: Introduction to the silicon photomultiplier (SiPM)

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App note from ON Semiconductors about SiPM sensors, explaining the working principle and primary performance parameters. Link here (PDF)

The Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) is a sensor that addresses the challenge of sensing, timing and quantifying low-light signals down to the single-photon level. Traditionally the province of the Photomultiplier Tube (PMT), the Silicon Photomultiplier now offers a highly attractive alternative that combines the low-light detection capabilities of the PMT while offering all the benefits of a solid-state sensor. The SiPM features low-voltage operation, insensitivity to magnetic fields, mechanical robustness and excellent uniformity of response. Due to these traits, the SensL® SiPM has rapidly gained a proven performance in the fields of medical imaging, hazard and threat detection, biophotonics, high energy physics and LiDAR.

App note: USB audio bridge example with STM32F0 MCUs

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App note from STMicroelectronics using their STM32F0 microcontrollers to playback audio stream from USB. Link here (PDF)

This application note describes a method and an example of synchronizing audio playback or audio recording with an upstream or downstream USB audio host, ensuring flawless audio listening or recording using only internal MCU resources.

Focusing on specific properties of USB microcontrollers from the STM32F0 family, the application note describes how the CRS unit can be beneficially employed for USB audio streaming synchronization. In particular, it elaborates a method of HSI48 clock frequency trimming to compensate for timing differences due to independent USB host (computer) and device (STM32F0) clock domains.

MickMake Mail #32: EEVBlog 121GW, spycam hacking and other bits.

I'm still in reno mode, so only a couple of quick things in this mailbag. The new EEVBlog 121GW multimeter, cheap spycam hacking, the failed WiFi temperature shower head and Unexpected Maker's WS2812 7 segment display. Continue reading MickMake Mail #32: EEVBlog 121GW, spycam hacking and other bits.

The post MickMake Mail #32: EEVBlog 121GW, spycam hacking and other bits. appeared first on MickMake.

How to use I2C LCD with ESP32 on Arduino IDE

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A how-to on using an I2C LCD display with the ESP32 using Arduino IDE from Random Nerd Tutorials:

This tutorial shows how to use the I2C LCD (Liquid Crystal Display) with the ESP32 using Arduino IDE. We’ll show you how to wire the display, install the library and try sample code to write text on the LCD: static text, and scroll long messages. You can also use this guide with the ESP8266.

See the full post at randomnerdtutorials.com.