HP 8620C sweep generator repaired

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Kerry Wong did a repair of an HP 8620C sweep generator we covered previously:

In my previous post, I did a teardown of an HP 8620C sweep generator along with an HP 86245A 5.9 GHz to 12.4 GHz RF plugin. A few of the plguin boards in the 8620C had leaked capacitors and also there seemed to be some sort of mechanical issue as no power was delivered to the transformer regardless of the power switch positions. So what I planed to do next was to restore the power to the unit and replace those bad capacitors and see if I could bring this sweep generator back to life.

See the full post on his blog here.

Check out the video after the break.

Implementing FizzBuzz on an FPGA

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Ken Shirriff writes:

I recently started FPGA programming and figured it would be fun to use an FPGA to implement the FizzBuzz algorithm. An FPGA (Field-Programmable Gate Array) is an interesting chip that you can program to implement arbitrary digital logic. This lets you build a complex digital circuit without wiring up individual gates and flip flops. It’s like having a custom chip that can be anything from a logic analyzer to a microprocessor to a video generator.
The “FizzBuzz test” is to write a program that prints the numbers from 1 to 100, except multiples of 3 are replaced with the word “Fizz”, multiples of 5 with “Buzz” and multiples of both with “FizzBuzz”. Since FizzBuzz can be implemented in a few lines of code, it is used as a programming interview question to weed out people who can’t program at all.

More details at Ken Shirriff’s blog.

10MHz distribution amplifier

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G4FRE built a 10MHz distribution amplifier:

I have had a need for a distribution amplifier for a while now. Searching around I found the design by G4JNT in Radcom, which filled my needs. I redrew the circuit for 4 outputs and had PCBs made. (if you want one contact me!)  I now have the units in my M1DST 10MHz Thunderbolt monitoring project and in my LPRO101 10MHz Rubidium source.

See the full post on his blog here.

Laser arm

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Facelesstech published a new build:

So some time last year I ordered one of those servo 2 axes (pan and tilt torret) arm kits from aliexpress. It was fun to play with but I didn’t quite find a reason to use it in a project. Then I seen this project on hackaday and a light bulb went off in my head, Why hadn’t I thought about adding a laser to the arm. This would be great to let your cat or dog play with or drive them mad.

 

Check out the video after the break.

App note: High-frequency automotive power supplies

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Switching power supply used in automotive electronics app note from Maxim Integrated. Link here (PDF)

The combination of high switching frequency and high-voltage capability is difficult to achieve in IC design. You can, however, design an automotive power supply that operates with high frequency if you protect it from temporary high-voltage conditions. High-frequency operation is becoming important as more and more electronic functions are integrated into the modern automobile. This article discusses several ways to protect low-voltage electronic circuits from the harsh effects of the automotive electrical environment. Also included are the results of laboratory tests for noise immunity.

App note: Fan speed control is cool!

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App note from Maxim Integrated about their MAX6650 and MAX6651 fan controllers chip. Link here (PDF)

Temperature-based fan control is a necessity in a growing number of systems, both to reduce system noise and to improve fan reliability. When fan control is augmented by fan-speed monitoring, a speed-control loop can be implemented that is independent of manufacturing variances and wear on the fan. In addition, a fan that is about to fail can be identified so that it can be replaced before it fails.