LoRa module in DIL form

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Mare writes:

Murata produces LoRa module CMWX1ZZABZ-xxx based on SX1276 transceiver and STM32L072CZ microcontroller. The soldering of the LGA module is not very hobby-friendly. I constructed small breakout PCB for this module with additional buck/boost switcher and place for SMA connector. The transceiver features the LoRa®long-range modem, providing ultra-long-range spread spectrum communication and high interference immunity, minimizing current consumption. Since CMWX1ZZABZ-091 is an “open” module, it is possible to access all STM32L072 peripherals such as ADC, 16-bit timer, LP-UART, I2C, SPI and USB 2.0 FS (supporting BCD and LPM), which are not used internally by SX1276.

More details on Mare & Gal Electronics site. Project files are available at Github.

ESP8266 SPI Spy

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nop head writes:

I came across a very useful post by Thomas Scherrer that describes how to read data from a Peacefair PZEM-021 energy meter by spying on the SPI bus with an Arduino. I decided to do the same thing with an ESP-12F WiFi module so that I could view the results remotely and plot graphs, etc. It took me a lot longer to get this working than I anticipated due to a few problems along the way.
The main hardware difference is the ESP8266 is a 3.3V device but the Arduino is 5V. The PZEM-021 is actually a mixture. The RN8208G metering chip is a 5V device. It is a SPI slave, the SPI master is an STM32 ARM processor that is 3.3V but with 5V tolerant inputs.

More details at HydraRaptor blog.

Alexa (Echo) with ESP32 and ESP8266 – Voice controlled relay

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Rui Santos writes, “In this project, you’re going to learn how to control the ESP8266 or the ESP32 with voice commands using Alexa (Amazon Echo Dot). As an example, we’ll control two 12V lamps connected to a relay module. We’ll also add two 433 MHz RF wall panel switches to physically control the lamps.”

More info at randomnerdtutorials.com.

Check out the video after the break.

Game audio for the ESP32

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ESP32 game audio at Buildlog.Net blog:

I have been working on some games for the ESP32 and needed some decent quality audio with a minimum number of additional components.  I was bouncing between using the DAC and using the I2S bus. The DAC requires less external parts, so I went that way. I ended up creating a very simple library for use in he Arduino IDE. (Note: This only works with ESP32)

Check out the video after the break.

ESP32lights

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Luca Dentella published a new build:

Today’s project, ESP32lights, is a smart device based on the esp32 chip.
Thanks to ESP32lights you can turn a load on and off (I used it for my christmas lights)

  • manually
  • based on daily schedules
  • based on the light intensity

ESP32lights connects to your wifi network, can be configured and operated via a web browser and it’s optimized for mobile devices (responsive web interface based on jQuery Mobile).

Full description on his blog. More tutorials about the ESP32 chip here.

Check out the video after the break.

Weather logger with Losant and Amazon Alexa

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Steve documented his experience experimenting with home weather logging:

Like a million other people on the Internet, I’ve been experimenting with home weather logging. I roll my eyes at the phrase “Internet of Things”, but it’s hard to deny the potential of cheap networked sensors and switches, and a weather logging system is like this field’s Hello World application. Back in June I posted about my initial experiments in ESP8266 weather logging. Since then I’ve finalized the hardware setup, installed multiple nodes around the house, organized a nice web page to analyze all the data, and integrated everything with Amazon Alexa. Time for an update.

More details at Big Mess o’ Wires homepage.

Check out the video after the break.

SQUIX ESP8266 based e-paper WiFi weather station

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Erich Styger documented his experience building Daniel Eichhorn’s e-paper weather station with a custom enclosure:

Using e-paper for a weather station is an ideal solution, as the data does not need to be updated often. By default, the station reaches out every 20 minutes for new data over WiFi and then updates the display. Daniel Eichhorn already has published kits for OLED (see “WiFi OLED Mini Weather Station with ESP8266“) and touch display (see “WiFi TFT Touch LCD Weather Station with ESP8266“). I like them both, but especially the TFT one is very power-hungry and not really designed to work from batteries. What I would like is a station which can run for weeks.

More details at MCU on Eclipse site.

WiFi TFT touch LCD weather station with ESP8266

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Erich Styger built this ESP8266 WiFi weather station with touch LCD and wrote a post on his blog detailing its assembly:

After the “WiFi OLED Mini Weather Station with ESP8266“, here is another one: this time with Touch LCD :-)  In the previous article (“WiFi OLED Mini Weather Station with ESP8266“) I have used the OLED kit from blog.squix.org. And as promised, this time it is about the “ESP8266 WiFi Color Display Kit”

Project info at MCU on Eclipse. Code is available on GitHub.

Pulsecounting and deepsleep based IoT water meter

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Tisham Dhar has written an article detailing his pulsecounting and deepsleep based IoT water meter project:

I admit to being a tiny bit obsessed with monitoring utility bills and gathering data on my usage patterns blow-by-blow. The energy monitoring has reduced my electricity bills, so I wanted to have a go at the water usage. Granted a lot of the water bill is fixed supply costs and sewerage charges which I can’t do much about.
A while ago I made some pulse counting breakouts with the DS1682+ RTC. I have finally got a chance to put them to good use interfacing with my mechanical water meter. The water meter has a spinning permanent magnet and in principle this can trigger a reed switch and generate pulses for accumulation by the RTC.

More details at Tisham Dhar’s blog.

Duck DNS ESP8266 mini WiFi client

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An ESP8266 Duck DNS client from Davide Gironi:

It is powered by USB, it can also be powered by the router USB port.
It’s built on a pretty old ESP-01 board.
It has two led, one is the ESP-01 WiFi connection status embedded one, the other is connected to the GPIO2 port, and it’s used for the DNS update status.

Project info at Davide Gironi’s blog.  Code is available on github.

Check out the video after the break.