Open source hardware ESP32-ADF

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Here’s an open source hardware development board for Espressif audio development framework, the ESP32-ADF, from Olimex:

With ESP32-WROOM-B module with 8MB RAM and 4MB of Flash, two microphones, two 3W speakers, codec, amplifier, Lipo charger, USB with programming, Audio 3.5mm jack, ESP32-ADF board offers everything you need to start playing with Espressif Audio Development Framework.

Check out the video after the break.

Control the bicycle traffic signal with a Particle Photon

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Glen has been working on a Wi-Fi enabled bicycle traffic signal project:

In the first post in this series, we built a miniature LED bicycle traffic signal using 3D printing, laser cutting, a sticker, and an Adafruit Neopixel Jewel. In this post, we’ll look at bringing the signal to life using a Particle Photon. We’ll start with basic code to blink the traffic signal green, yellow, and red then add code to control the color over the web using the Particle Cloud or locally using an iPad and the Art-Net protocol.

More details on Photons, Electrons, and Dirt blog.

WiFiChron alarm clock

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Here’s a cool WiFiChron clock with 8-character alphanumeric LED display by Florinc:

For WiFiChron, two cascaded modules make an 8-character display functionally similar to HDSP-2534, but bigger and more visible. With the “Display Abstraction Layer” already in place, software support should be easy to integrate, since controlling it with the HT16K33 breakout allows the re-use of the above mentioned Adafruit LED backpack library. For maximum compatibility, I followed the same wiring, then connected the two extra segments, A2 and D2, to pin 10 (not connected for the 14-segment backpack) and pin 11 (connected to the DP), respectively.

More details on Wise time with Arduino blog.

Wifi based DIY 5V switcher for led-lights

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Albert posted a detailed how-to on building DIY ESP-12F based USB-5V switcher:

5V powered 100LED circuit was consuming around ~1.8Watts(though 5.1Ohm series resistor was really hot) and the brightness of the LED’s were not bad, especially difference between first led and last led brightness didnt bother me it was hardly noticeable when seen from distance. So I decided to use them as a christmas decoration for my garden.
I wanted to use them with battery-bank as there was no power-outlet readily available(for the safety of my children, i would avoid any 230v circuit in my garden especially in wet weather). Also I wanted them to be switchable remotely to avoid going out in the freezing cold. Hence this is what i came up with.. an “ESP-12F based USB-5V switcher”

See the full post on his blog.

Weather station project

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Alvaro Prieto has been working on a wireless weather station project:

After playing around with the breakout boards, I decided it was time to integrate it all in a single board. I named it Chaac.
This is where I ran into issues with MBED. Making the board support package (BSP) for a custom board was not trivial. Another issue was that I couldn’t get the low-power modes working quite right. At the same time, I decided to ditch GPS, since the weather station is unlikely to move without my knowledge . With the new requirements, I ended up switching to an STM32L432KC based board.

See the full post on his blog.

New 2.5D pen/laser ESP32 controller

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Bdring published a new build:

I have done several pen and laser machines lately, so I decided to create a custom PCB for Grbl_ESP32 for these types of machines. This is a small (70mm x 60mm) PCB with all the features a pen plotter or laser cutter/engraver would need.
These typically use stepper motors for the X and Y axes. On pen plotters, the Z axis is controlled by a servo or solenoid. On lasers you need an accurate PWM for laser power control.

Project info at Buildlog.Net blog and the library GitHub repository here. It’s also up on Tindie.

trigBoard – Ultra low power ESP8266 IoT platform

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Kevin Darrah writes:

The trigBoard is an IoT project that does one thing – it pushes you a notification triggered by a digital input. Well, it’s much more than that, but this is the inspiration. I wanted to design a WiFi board that essentially sleeps most of its life, but when that door switch, flood sensor, motion sensor, etc.. gets triggered, I just want a notification immediately on my phone. And that’s about it… a perfect IoT device in the background doing its job.

Project info on Kevin Darrah Wiki. It’s also up on Tindie.

Check out the video after the break.

uMesh – A self-contained, battery operated ESP32 module

Jarrett published a new build:

I’ve been working on an ESP32 module. Part of the problem I’ve been seeing with inexpensive IoT dev boards, is that the design around the power system hasn’t been very good. Here’s my attempt to fix that. This is a battery-ready module with a proper lithium battery charge circuit, lithium battery protection circuit, power supply, and antenna, all in a 1 inch by 1 inch package.
The goal is to have a tiny, inexpensive module that can immediately accept a battery and be deployed in the field, along with 30 of its mates.

See the full post on his blog.

Project PITA: Build a mini mass deauther using Bettercap and a Raspberry Pi Zero W

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evilsocket shared a how-to on making a mini WiFi deauthenticator using Bettercap and a Raspberry Pi Zero W:

A few days ago I started playing with some idea I had from a few weeks already, using a Raspberry Pi Zero W to make a mini WiFi deauthenticator: something in my pocket that periodically jumps on all the channels in the WiFi spectrum, collects information about the nearby access points and their connected clients and then sends a deauthentication packet to each one of them, resulting in some sort of WiFi jammer on the 802.11 level. As an interesting “side effect” of this jammer (the initial intent was purely for the lulz) is that the more it deauths, the higher the changes to also sniff WPA2 handshakes.

See the full post on Evilsocket blog.

LoRa module in DIL form

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Mare writes:

Murata produces LoRa module CMWX1ZZABZ-xxx based on SX1276 transceiver and STM32L072CZ microcontroller. The soldering of the LGA module is not very hobby-friendly. I constructed small breakout PCB for this module with additional buck/boost switcher and place for SMA connector. The transceiver features the LoRa®long-range modem, providing ultra-long-range spread spectrum communication and high interference immunity, minimizing current consumption. Since CMWX1ZZABZ-091 is an “open” module, it is possible to access all STM32L072 peripherals such as ADC, 16-bit timer, LP-UART, I2C, SPI and USB 2.0 FS (supporting BCD and LPM), which are not used internally by SX1276.

More details on Mare & Gal Electronics site. Project files are available at Github.