Solar powered WiFi weather station

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A detailed instructions of how to build this weather station project by Open Green Energy:

This Instructable is a continuation to my earlier weather station project. It was quite popular on the web, people around the globe made their own by following it and given valuable feedbacks for improvement.By taking consideration in to the comments and Q&A section of my earlier project, I decided to make this new version Weather Station.I also made a custom PCB for this project, so any one with little knowledge on electronics circuit can be made this project. My V-2.0 PCB can also be used for many application in Arduino platform. Following are the salient features of new weather station

Project instructables here.

ESP8266 Wi-Fi button – DIY Amazon dash button clone

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Rui Santos over at Random Nerd Tutorials posted a step by step guide on building an ESP8266 Wi-Fi button:

In this project you’re going to build an ESP8266 Wi-Fi Button that can trigger any home automation event. This is like a remote control that you can take in your pocket or place anywhere that when pressed sends out an email. It can also be called a DIY Amazon Dash Button clone.

Check out the video after the break.

 

Track Wi-Fi Devices In Your Home

How do you audit your home Wi-Fi network? Perhaps you log into your router and have a look at the connected devices. Sometimes you’ll find an unexpected guest, but a bit of detective work will usually lead you to the younger nephew’s game console or that forgotten ESP8266 on your bench.

Wouldn’t it be useful if your router could tell you where all the devices connected to it are? If you are [Zack Scholl], you can do all this and more, for his FIND-LF system logs Wi-Fi probe requests from all Wi-Fi devices within its range even if they are not connected, and triangulates their position from their relative signal strengths across several sniffing receivers. These receivers are a network of Raspberry Pis with their own FIND-LF server, and any probe requests they pick up are forwarded to [Zack]’s FIND server (another of his projects) which does the work of collating the locations of devices.

It’s an impressive piece of work, though with a Raspberry Pi at each receiver it could get a little pricey. [Zack has done other work in this field aside from the two projects mentioned here, his other work includes an implementation of the [Harry Potter] Marauder’s Map.

This is by no means the only indoor location system we’ve seen over the years. One that uses ESP8266 modules for example, or this commercial product that is similar to the project shown here.


Filed under: wireless hacks