App note: Basics and low-cost solution proposals to move from legacy USB2.0 connector to USB Type-C™ connector with STM32 devices

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App note from STMicroelectronics about interfacing STM32 legacy USB 2.0 to USB Type-C. Link here (PDF)

This application note is a guideline to introduce this USB Type-C connector onto platform to replace legacy USB2.0 connectors. It introduces some basis of the two new standards USB Type-C™ and the USB Power Delivery.

App note: USB Type-C protection and filtering

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STMicroelectronics’ solution for simplifying USB Type-C protection and filtering using transient voltage suppressors, common mode filtering and proper board layout. Link here (PDF)

The USB interface has been present on the market for nearly 2 decades and thanks to that, nowadays it is quite obvious for everybody to connect electronic devices in this manner. However, the presence of different types of connectors: type A, type B, mini USB, micro USB etc., makes difficult and complicated the choice of the right one. For this reason USB Type-C, a unique connector to drive audio and power data up to 5 or 10 Gbps, is now available.

Due to the fact that for its own nature a connector is a link to the outside world, it may be exposed to a lot of disturbances which can ruin the transceivers. Moreover, the high-speed links radiate therefore an efficient filter has to be used to solve antenna desense.

STMicroelectronics has developed some specific protection devices and common mode filters with optimized performance and layout.

App note: USB Type-C, CC Pin Design Considerations

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Application note from ON Semiconductor on USB Type-C connector supporting non-USB standard charging protocol, Link here (PDF)

When designing hardware systems with Type−C connectors, a designer also has to consider all legacy, standard, and non-standard specifications that exist in the USB connector eco system. With the introduction of the Type−C connector and the Configuration channel (CC Pin) new challenges occur trying to ensure overall system robustness. This note addresses some of the concerns with the CC pin in a robust system environment.

App note: PCB routing methodology for SuperSpeed USB 3.1 switch family from ON Semiconductor

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Routing USB 3.1 traces app note from ON Semiconductor. Link here (PDF)

The introduction of USB Type−C has provided a significant launch opportunity for USB3.1 data rates across an array of platforms from portable to desktop and beyond. This proliferation of Type−C will certainly create challenges due to the high speed nature of the interface. High Speed USB2.0 presented enough of a system design challenge for tiny mobile device OEM’s trying to pass USB eye compliance. A 10X or even 20X increase in data rates will propagate that challenge far beyond the issues that were raised with HS. PCB traces in these systems must be treated as sensitive transmission lines where low-loss impedance control is king. Every effort must be made to make these paths as ideal as possible to prevent signal loss and unwanted emissions that could infect other systems in the device.

App note: USB Type C, CC Pin design considerations, high voltage design considerations for Type-C connector pins in systems supporting non-USB standard charging protocol and/or fault cases

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Another app note from Fairchild Semiconductors on USB Type C to USB legacy design considerations. Link here (PDF)

When designing hardware systems with type C connectors, a designer also has to consider all legacy, standard, and nonstandard specifications that exist in the USB connector eco system. With the introduction of the Type C connector and the Configuration channel (CC Pin) new challenges occur trying to ensure overall system robustness. This note addresses some of the concerns with the CC pin in a robust system environment.

App note: USB Type-C design considerations, USB Type-C adapters

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Type-C USB cable adapter design consideration app note from Fairchild Semiconductors. Link here (PDF)

USB is a ubiquitous connector that is used by many customers and in many different applications. With the official release of the USB Type-C connector, many companies are racing to implement this new connector and the supporting infrastructure. The early adopters of this connector will be faced with many challenges as different vendor’s release products that are either non-compliant or designed to earlier versions of the specification.

One specific challenge is with USB Type-C adapter cables and how they are implemented. The adapter cables are critical for new designs because they allow backward compatibility to the existing USB infrastructure. Vendors are making a wide range of adapter cables which can cause detection issues which need to be considered. This application note describes these considerations and possible solutions to the problems faced.