Capcom CPS2 security programming guide

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Eduardo Cruz from Arcade Hacker  writes:

Dear all, after a few months of testing we are extremely happy to release the new clean desuicide / security programing method for Capcom’s CPS2 hardware.
This guide is the result of almost two years of work by an small group of arcade enthusiasts to unravel the secrets of the security implementation found in one of the largest and most popular arcade platform systems. Thanks for this work it is now possible to fully preserve any CPS2 systems as original hardware.

More details at Arcade Hacker blog.

Check out the video after the break.

 

Pi Zero POV

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Francesco over at Garage Tech posted a detailed how-to on building a Raspberry Pi Zero POV setup to display text from a file using an LED:

The most important part of getting the Pi Zero POV to run smoothly is given by how do you fix the payload of this spinning rocket onto the CD. Placing the Pi Zero in the right place will make so that when turning, the whole setup will have as little as possible vibrations. The rule of thumb we followed was to drill two 3 mm holes on opposite sides of the central hole of the CD and so that they would sit on one of the disk diameters.

Full details at Garage Tech homepage.

Make the world’s cheapest MIDI tester

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Jesse from Bent-Tronics has posted a tutorial on how to make a DIY MIDI tester:

A quick and dirty (and cheap) MIDI tester.  Sometimes you just need to know if a MIDI controller is outputting anything. Even many high-end MIDI modules/boxes will have a “MIDI Activity” light, just to let you know something is being transmitted/received. That’s what I have made in this video.
Using a sacrificial MIDI cable, an LED, and a 220 Ohm resistor, you too can make this tester/activity light, probably in less than 10 minutes.

More details at Bent-Tronics homepage.

Check out the video after the break.

 

How to build a control circuit with adjustable working time via wi-fi

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Yahya Tawil over at All About Circuits posted a detailed how-to on building a control circuit with adjustable working time via Wi-Fi:

In this article, you’ll learn how to build a system that can turn DC loads on and off using a mobile application. You’ll also learn how to perform this task via immediate actions or via timers set in advance for switching loads on and off.
You can implement this system in environments where you need to set your DC load for a specific time. This will allow you to use our Android application without any need for a hardware interface, keypad, and LCD screen.

More details at All About Circuits project page.

Check out the video after the break.

Neoway M590 GPRS tutorial: sending and receiving files from/to SD card

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Neoway M590 GPRS tutorial on sending and receiving files from/to SD card from Vadim Panov:

Here’s a bit of useful info from what I’ve been doing lately. I got a job to design a device that connects to a web-server via GPRS and downloads a bunch of tiny WAV files, that it later plays on a specific schedule. Now, there’s a jellybean part for this kind of task, and that is SIM900 (or SIM800), but I have a knock for “optimising” my electronics. Optimising in this context means making everything I can as cheap as possible, provided it doesn’t impact overall quality in a negative way.
That’s how I came upon this el cheapo GPRS module – Neoway M590. It’s sold as an assemble-it-yourself kit at Aliexpress, and at the moment of writing this article it retails for as low as 2USD.

More details on Vadim Panov’s blog.

Chrome Apps and serial port communication

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Luca Dentella writes, “When it comes to develop a GUI for your project, you may need to be sure it will be available for users under Windows, Linux and MacOS.
Chrome Apps may be the solution: they are developed using the same technologies behind any websites (HTML5, CSS, javascript) but, thanks to the Chrome APIs, they offer a seamless desktop integration and the ability to access hardware devices such as serial ports.”

Full details at lucadentella.it.

Via the contact form.

Getting started with OPENOCD using FT2232H adapter for SWD debugging

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Yahya Tawil wrote a tutorial about flashing EFM32 MCUs with OpenOCD using FT2232H adapter:

Learn how to make flashing your ARM-based MCU easy by using OpenOCD debugger with an FT2232H adapter.
Old MCUs from vendors like ATMEL and MICROCHIP, like the PIC16F and Atmega family, tend to have a special programming interface to program internal flash. For example, Atmega used SPI pins (MISO, MOSI, SCK) and PIC used two pins (PGC, PGD)— one as a clock and another as a bi-directional data line.
New MCUs, especially with an ARM core, use JTAG/SWD as a programming/debugging interface.

Full details at All About Circuits homepage.

Eagle CAD tips and tricks, part 2

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Here’s the part 2 of Yahya Tawil’s Eagle CAD tips and tricks we covered previously:

In part 1, we talked about the importance of issuing commands with your keyboard and using your mouse effectively. In this part, we will continue talking about other useful tips and tricks for using Eagle CAD.
Read part 1’s tips and tricks here.

More details at All About Circuits homepage.

Via the contact form.