A transmit converter (and amplifier) for 630 and 2200 meters

TX_Conv_Internal_1a

KA7OEI has a great write-up on building a transmit converter for 630 and 2200 meters:

As the name implies, a transmit converter takes another frequency – such as that produced by a conventional HF transceiver – and converts it to another frequency.  In my case I use an FT-817 – a low-power (5 watt) all-mode, all-band transceiver that is a favorite for VHF, UHF and microwave enthusiasts that use transverters.  Because of its small size, feature set and already-low output power, it is a natural to be used in this application.

See the full post on his blog.

Measuring Spurious Emissions of Cheap Handheld Transceivers

If you buy an amateur transceiver cheap enough to make a reasonable grab bag gift or stocking stuffer, you get what you pay for. And if this extensive analysis of cheap radios is any indication, you get a little more than you pay for in the spurious emissions department.

Amateur radio in the United States is regulated by the FCC’s Part 97 rules with special attention given to transmitter technical specifications in Subpart D. Spurious emissions need to be well below the mean power of the fundamental frequency of the transmitter, and [Megas3300] suspected that the readily available Baofeng UV-5RA dual-band transceiver was a little off spec. He put the $20 radio through a battery of tests using equipment that easily cost two orders of magnitude more than the test subject. Power output was verified with a wattmeter, proper attenuators were selected, and the output signal scanned with a spectrum analyzer. Careful measurements showed that some or all of the Baofeng’s harmonics were well above the FCC limits. [Megas3300] tested a few other radios that turned out to be mostly compliant, but however it all turned out, the test procedure is well documented and informative, and well worth a look.

The intended market for these radios is more the unlicensed crowd than the compliant ham, so it’s not surprising that they’d be out of spec. A ham might want to bring these rigs back into compliance with a low pass filter, for which purpose the RF Biscuit might prove useful.

[via r/AmateurRadio]


Filed under: classic hacks, misc hacks

Pen FM transmitter bug

pen-fm-transmitter-bug

A pen FM transmitter bug project from Electronics-DIY:

Pen FM Transmitter bug projects have been very popular. The idea of being able to hide a transmitter in a pen is very appealing. In an effort to reduce the size of this design, we have used surface-mount components. Firstly, the thought of using the coil in the tank circuit for transmitting RF was a little far fetched, but we used it as an example for those who were interested in experimenting with our circuits. Now we have gone back to a conventional antenna, the whip. The whip or straight-line antenna can be coiled, wound longitudinally or folded. The way it is wound makes a big difference to its effectiveness, but when you are limited in space, you have to accept these limitations. Even though we have used this antenna set up in our previous pen bugs we have considerably improved the circuit to the point were it has low battery consumption, but high RF output. The size of this design has been reduced considerably by using surface-mount components.