1750Hz tone generator

tone-burst-generator

Dilshan Jayakody published a new build:

The 1750Hz tone bursts are often used to trigger repeaters. There are several methods to build 1750Hz tone generators which including TC5082 divider, using MCUs, etc.
In this post, I present another 1750Hz tone generator which I built using 74HC4060 high-speed 14-stage binary ripple counter and 7.168MHz crystal. In this design, 74HC4060 is used to drive the crystal and divide its output by 4096. By using 7.168MHz crystal, this circuit produces 1750.0Hz square wave output with a 50% duty cycle.

See the full post on his blog.

A Vintage Single Transistor LED Blinker

[Eric Wasatonic] had a box of SWB2433 transistors that he had very little information about. In order to discover their properties, he fired up his curve tracer to compare these transistors with more common ones. He noticed the SWB2433 exhibited negative resistance while the similar curves of a 2n3904 didn’t. Then he reverse-biased the two transistors: the negative resistance region on the 2n3904 was less than that of the SWB2433, but it was there, and a 2n2222 had a bigger region. Using this knowledge, he developed a relaxation oscillator circuit which uses a negatively biased transistor.

Using one transistor, one resistor and one capacitor, he describes the circuit and how the components affect the frequency of the sawtooth wave the oscillator creates. [Eric] uses the oscillator to build a simple LED blinker and shows what happens when he changes the transistor and adjusts the voltage or resistance. He also shows the circuit as a tone generator and adjusts the tone by replacing the resistor with a potentiometer. And then, for fun, he modifies the circuit to show the oscillator as an AM transmitter. Check out his video after the break.

Of course, [Eric Wasatonic] didn’t come up with this idea (he links to this Simple LED Flasher Circuit page in the description of the video) but [Eric] shows us the process he took discovering the negative resistance of the transistor and the results of the circuits. Even though there are other ways to blink a LED and other ways to make an oscillator, [Eric]’s circuit is about as simple as it gets.

[Thanks, fede.tft]


Filed under: led hacks, parts

‘Magic tree’ project

TREE-ORGAN-PROTOTYPE

Dilshan Jayakody has published a new build, a ‘Musical trees’:

“Musical trees” is a part of creative arts installation and this project is capable to produce different audio tones by detecting human touch to its attached plants. Existing version of this driver is capable to monitor 8 plants and produce different sounds for each plant.
This project is build around PIC16F628A 8-bit microcontroller and PT2399 echo processor IC. To drive the sensor electrodes we use pair of CD4011 quad 2-input NAND gate ICs. This prototype use TDA7052 1W audio amplifier IC to drive the speaker(s).

More details at Jayakody’s blog.

Check out the video after the break.