‘No-Parts’ temperature measurement with Arduino Pro Mini

1 sec WDT interval timed with micros() vs si7051 reference temperature, to determine temperature variation of the RC based timer vs the crystal based timer, as a function of temperature

From the comments on our ESP8266 temperature logger post, Edward Mallon  writes:

The ESP8266 has a hardware watchdog timer, so you could probably use that to measure temperature to much better resolution that you’d get from a DS18B20. We get better than 0.003C using the technique with cheap Pro Mini Clones
Ooops, I missed an important aspect of the two clock method – the inter-reading jitter in the micros() reads brings the resolution down to DS18b20 levels.

More details on Underwater Arduino Data Loggers blog.

The K7TMG HF Morse code temperature beacon

p-r0009297-600

AA7EE published a new build, a little temperature beacon:

This was a fun little project – and it gave me an idea for a future one. Sometimes, I find that the more complex undertakings, which require more planning, can get to the point that they “take me over” somewhat. At that point, for me, some of the fun starts getting squeezed out and that, of course, absolutely cannot be allowed to happen. This is the time when simple and fun projects save the day.

Check out the video after the break.

See the full post at Dave Richards AA7EE blog.

Comfort Thermometer With Impressive LED Display

A frequent early project for someone learning to use a microcontroller such as an Arduino board involves hooking up a temperature sensor and an LCD display to make a digital thermometer. Not many components are involved, but it provides a handy practical introduction to interfacing peripherals. Once you’ve passed that step in your tech education, do you ever return to thermometers? Probably not, after all what can you add to a thermometer but a sensor and a display?

Perhaps if you have asked yourself that question you might be interested in [Richard Stevens]’s thermometer project, as he refers to it, a Comfort Thermometer Display. It takes the form of an Ikea Ribba frame inset with 517 LEDs arranged as a central set of seven segment displays, a ring of bar graphs, and an outer ring of RGB LEDs. Behind the scenes is a mass of cabling, and four shaped pieces of stripboard to fit the area around the LEDs. The display cycles through readings for temperature, heat index, and humidity.

Powering it all are a brace of microcontrollers: an ATMega328 for the 7-segments and a range of PICs controlling the bar graphs and RGB LEDs. Another PIC handles RF communication with the sensors, which are housed in a remote box. We’ve embedded the video of the device in operation below the break, and we’re sure you’ll agree it’s an impressive piece of work.

There is a strong community of Ikea hackers out there who create amazing things from the Swedish superstore’s products. We’ve shown you one of [Richard]’s previous projects, a weather station in an Ikea lamp, but there are many others such as this CNC machine on an Ikea table to be found.


Filed under: home hacks

Hacking Together a Temperature Sensor for Boiling Milk

Ever have trouble justifying your hacking to anyone from another generation? [Domen] presented his mother with a custom-made device that monitors the milk temperature as it boils on the stove, preventing boil-over. And he made the device robust, simple to use, and foolproof. To his mom, it must look like he’s a wizard — able to conjure up home electronics out of solder smoke and some plywood.

Of course, we know better. Inside his gadget is a simple temperature sensor, an ATtiny841, a very nice home-made PCB, a buzzer, an LCD, and some pushbuttons. [Domen] rubbed together a few pre-existing libraries, and had a working prototype inside a nice wooden box on the quick. It’s a simple hack, but imagine how this must look to a muggle. For the detailed incantations, check out [Domen]’s GitHub for the project.

We especially like the dowel-based button caps and the overall clean and simple aesthetic. It speaks of both the materials on hand and the intended user. [Domen] says that he’s going to add a low-temperature alarm too, which will add a second alarm for when the milk has cooled down enough to add in the cultures that make yogurt — presumably the reason for the boiling milk in the first place. And check out the rivets on the double-sided board. We love that technique here at our home labs.

This project exemplifies one of the reasons that we DIY. It fills a ridiculously niche need, and fills it with style. Try buying that at Walmart!


Filed under: ATtiny Hacks