Easing the pain of SWD on modern DPS:es

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Johan Kanflo writes:

On newer DPS:es, the SWD connector is a JST-GH (1.25mm spacing that is) which translates to “really tiny”. The annular rings where you need to apply solder and heat for adding wires are even smaller. This is why the OpenDPS SWD Bottle is handy. Add three P50-E2 pogo pins, and connect to your favourite SWD debugger.

See the full post on his blog.

Modifying the Teensy 3.5 and 3.6 for ARM SWD debugging

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Erich Styger @ mcuoneclipse.com writes:

Looking for a small, inexpensive ($25-30) ARM development board (say 120-180 MHz ARM Cortex-M4 with FPU, 512kB-1MB of FLASH and 256 KByte of RAM? Then have a look at the Teensy 3.5 and Teensy 3.6 by PJRC/Paul Stoffregen
The only problem? it is not possible to debug it :-(. At least not in the traditional sense. This article is about how to change the board to use it with any normal SWD debugging tool e.g. Eclipse and the Segger J-Link :-).

More details at MCU on Eclipse homepage.

Getting started with OPENOCD using FT2232H adapter for SWD debugging

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Yahya Tawil wrote a tutorial about flashing EFM32 MCUs with OpenOCD using FT2232H adapter:

Learn how to make flashing your ARM-based MCU easy by using OpenOCD debugger with an FT2232H adapter.
Old MCUs from vendors like ATMEL and MICROCHIP, like the PIC16F and Atmega family, tend to have a special programming interface to program internal flash. For example, Atmega used SPI pins (MISO, MOSI, SCK) and PIC used two pins (PGC, PGD)— one as a clock and another as a bi-directional data line.
New MCUs, especially with an ARM core, use JTAG/SWD as a programming/debugging interface.

Full details at All About Circuits homepage.

Open-source SWD programming adapter

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Ethan Zonca from Protofusion writes, “After making the switch from AVR to STM32 microcontrollers, I redesigned my old 6-pin ICSP pogo-programming adapter for SWD. The new design allows programming with pogo pins or a small pin header soldered to the pogo pads for debugging, all with the same cable. The footprint uses surface mount pads only, so it can be placed on even the most compact board layouts.”

More info at  Protofusion.org project page.