Homebrew DMX-controlled RGB LED light

IMG_20190324_102016_cover_photo-600

Glen has written an article detailing his homebrew DMX-controlled RGB LED light:

This project is a small DMX-512 controlled, color-changing RGB LED light. The light can be controlled via the DMX512 protocol or it can run a number of built-in programs depending on how the software is configured. The light incorporates an advanced 16-bit PIC24 microcontroller with PWM capabilities, a 3D printed enclosure, a laser cut acrylic lid, a custom switching power supply, and a MEMS oscillator. The light measures roughly 2.25″ square by 1.25″ high. This light is the evolution of my RGB LED light designs that span back over a decade.

Project info on Photons, Electrons, and Dirt blog.

App note: HT66FB574/572 colour effect USB mouse

an_holtek_AN0483E

App note from Holtek on using their HT66FB574/572 to develop color effect mice. Link here (PDF)

Demands from the video gaming industry for different types of gaming mouse continue to expand. Adding a large number of RGB LEDs to the mice can produce different colours and brightness changes creating a range of visual special effects. This enhances the colour and stimulating effects of gaming mice. For example, having multiple RGB LEDs to form an outer ring on a gaming mouse can produce a colour changing waterflow effect. These are known as colour effect USB mice.

Light Pipes and LEDs Team Up for a Modern Take on the Nixie Tube

There’s no doubting the popularity of Nixie tubes these days. They lend a retro flair to modern builds and pop up in everything from clocks to weather stations. But they’re not without their problems — the high voltage, the limited tube life, and the fact that you can have them in any color you want as long as it’s orange. Seems like it might be time for a modern spin on the Nixie that uses LEDs and light pipes. Meet Nixie Pipes.

Inspired by an incandescent light-pipe alphanumeric display from a 1970s telephone exchange, [John Whittington]’s design captures the depth and look of a Nixie by using laminated acrylic sheets. Each layer is laser etched with dots in the shape of a character or icon, and when lit from below by a WS2812B LED, the dots pick up the light and display the character in any color. [John]’s modular design allows one master and an arbitrary number of slaves, so large displays can simply be plugged together. [John] is selling a limited run of the Nixie Pipes online, but he’s also open-sourced the project so you can build your own modules.

We really like the modularity and flexibility of Nixie Pipes, and the look is pretty nice too. Chances are good that it won’t appeal to the hardcore Nixie aficionado, though, in which case building your own Nixies might be a good project to tackle.


Filed under: led hacks, misc hacks

How Hot is Your Faucet? What Color is the Water?

How hot is the water coming out of your tap? Knowing that the water in their apartment gets “crazy hot,” redditor [AEvans28] opted to whip up a visual water temperature display to warn them off when things get a bit spicy.

This neat little device is sequestered away inside an Altoids mint tin — an oft-used, multi-purpose case for makers. Inside sits an ATtiny85 microcontroller  — re-calibrated using an Arduino UNO to a more household temperature scale ranging from dark blue to flashing red — with additional room for a switch, while the 10k ohm NTC thermristor and RGB LED are functionally strapped to the kitchen faucet using electrical tape. The setup is responsive and clearly shows how quickly [AEvans28]’s water heats up.

This is version 1.5 — 1.0 rusted out, protect your projects, people! — and a forthcoming 2.0 will feature a smoother transition between colors. In the meantime, [AEvans28] had made his ATTtny code available here for anyone else similarly maligned by scalding tap water. If you are more concerned about the temperature of your wine, but don’t have the room for an appropriate cellar, get serious with this DIY satand-in.

[via /r/DIY]


Filed under: ATtiny Hacks