Qi wireless power receiver from scratch

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Vinod made a Qi wireless power receiver using Attiny13, that is available on GitHub:

I have only two aims while trying this. The receiver should get powered by the transmitter continuously. I should be able to control the power received by adjusting the error packets, in my case I am trying to keep received voltage always 10v.
There are lot more but I am only interested in this two features for now, so I will not be following the complete Qi specs described on the WPC documents, by the way, it worked for me without any issue. This is purely experimental.

See the full post on his blog.

Check out the video after the break.

Yet another CXA1191 FM radio receiver

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Dilshan Jayakody has published a new build:

This is simple, but very high quality CXA1191S based FM radio receiver system. In this design we use Sony CXA1191S as FM tuner and TDA2003 as an audio amplifier. This receiver system is designed to work with 12V DC power source and it delivers approximately 6W audio output power (with 4Ω speaker load).

Check out more details on his blog here. Project files are available at elect.wikispaces.com.

A 2-channel receiver that can save your old Motorola TX

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Boris Landoni writes about a new open source project 2-channel receiver that can save your old Motorola TX:

A 433,92 MHz Receiver that can be paired with a maximum of 10 Motorola TX each with relay outputs that can be set both in monostable or bistable mode.

Although we have had high security encoding for several years, based for instance on rolling-codes, a lot of remote controls and especially those installed long time ago in houses and other places for opening gates, are based on fixed and relatively simple encoding like the MM53200 of former National Semiconductor and the Motorola MC14502x; the latter had two new elements at the time of its introduction, that were the high (for the times) number of combinations allowed (19,683) and the three-state encoding (each encoding input of the encoder and of the decoder would allow three logic levels and required special three-state dip-switches).

More details at open-electronics.org.

Hacked Television Uses No Power In Standby Mode

How much effort do you put into conserving energy throughout your daily routine? Diligence in keeping lights and appliances turned off are great steps, but those selfsame appliances likely still draw power when not in use. Seeing the potential to reduce energy wasted by TVs in standby mode, the [Electrical Energy Management Lab] team out of the University of Bristol have designed a television that uses no power in standby mode.

The feat is accomplished through the use of a chip designed to activate at currents as low as 20 picoamps.  It, and a series of five photodiodes, is mounted in a receiver which attaches to the TV. The receiver picks up the slight infrared pulse from the remote, inducing a slight current in the receiving photodiodes, providing enough power to the chip which in turn flips the switch to turn on the TV. A filter prevents ambient light from activating the receiver, and while the display appears to take a few seconds longer to turn on than an unmodified TV, that seems a fair trade off if you aren’t turning it on and off every few minutes.

While some might shy away from an external receiver, the small circuit could be handily integrated into future TVs. In an energy conscious world, modifications like these can quickly add up.

We featured a similar modification using a light-sensitive diode a few years ago that aimed to reduce the power consumption of a security system. Just be wary of burglars wielding flashlights.

[Thanks for the submission, Bernard!]


Filed under: hardware, home entertainment hacks

Forty-9er Shield

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m0xpd writes:

I’ve been tinkering with a quick lash-up of Wayne Burdick, n6kr’s famous ‘Forty-9er’ receiver, implemented on an Arduino shield and tuned by one of my DDS systems.
Regular readers will remember how I tried running my Kanga / m0xpd Sudden-inspired receiver shield under the control of the new DDS on the Internet of Things board and found the latter to cause a lot of noise problems. I stripped out unnecessary active stages in the Rx shield to try to manage some of the receiver’s susceptibility to the hostile EM environment generated by the ESP8266 and realised that I was left with something which resembled not only a Sudden but also any other SA602 / LM386 receiver – including the Forty-9er.

More details at m0xpd’s blog.

19th century radio technology meets the Beaglebone

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Ashish Derhgawen built a coherer-based receiver with a simple decoherer mechanism, and connected it to a Beaglebone to decode the received signals:

In my last post, I described how I made a spark-gap transmitter and receiver. For the transmitter, I used a car’s ignition coil to produce high voltage sparks, and for the receiver, I used a coherer to detect the transmissions. A coherer is a simple device – it consists of iron filings between two electrodes. Normally the filings have very high electrical resistance (tens of megaohms), but when the coherer detects electromagnetic waves, its resistance drops to about 10-20 ohms.

More details at Ashish’s blog.

Check out the video after the break.