Pi Zero POV


Francesco over at Garage Tech posted a detailed how-to on building a Raspberry Pi Zero POV setup to display text from a file using an LED:

The most important part of getting the Pi Zero POV to run smoothly is given by how do you fix the payload of this spinning rocket onto the CD. Placing the Pi Zero in the right place will make so that when turning, the whole setup will have as little as possible vibrations. The rule of thumb we followed was to drill two 3 mm holes on opposite sides of the central hole of the CD and so that they would sit on one of the disk diameters.

Full details at Garage Tech homepage.

Using a Bus Pirate to connect to a Raspberry Pi


Scott Dixon describes on his website how he used the Bus Pirate to connect to a Raspberry Pi:

The other day I found myself with a Rasberry Pi that I wanted to use but I had forgotten my FTDI UART cable. What I did have is my Bus Pirate v3.6 and I found it was pretty easy to use it’s transpartent UART bridge macro to connect to the Pi.

More details at 0x20 homepage.

Get your own handy Bus Pirate for $30, including world-wide shipping. Also available from our friendly distributors.

Raspberry Pi web server using flask to control GPIOs


Rui Santos from Random Nerd Tutorials writes:

In this project you’ll create a standalone web server with a Raspberry Pi that can toggle two LEDs. You can replace those LEDs with any output (like a relay or a transistor).
In order to create the web server you will be using a Python microframework called Flask.

More details at Random Nerd Tutorials homepage.

Check out the video after the break.

BeagleBone Black GPIO Benchmark


Joonas Pihlajamaa from Code and Life writes, ” I’ve previously made a GPIO benchmark of Raspberry Pi 1 and 2, and have always wanted to see how BeagleBone Black would stack against the Pis. I recently got one so the obvious thing to do was to see how fast the little thing could go.  Turns out, the little thing needed a bit more work than the Pi, but the results were quite interesting.”

More details at Code and Life homepage.

Via the contact form.

Bringing a vintage telegraph into the digital age


Kyle Gabriel writes:

I recently inherited a key on board (KOB) telegraph that my late grandfather used to practice Morse code with when he was a kid (Figure 1). A little bit of curiosity of how it would work and a little bit of displeasure from seeing it sit and collect dust, I began a journey to resurrect the old machine and develop some software to bring it into the digital age.

More details at Kyle Gabriel’s blog.

Check out the video after the break.