Pocket Pi

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A Raspberry pi zero w pocket terminal project from Facelesstech, that is available on Github:

So if you have been following my blog lately you may have noticed me rambling on about trying to get a Xbox 360 chat pad and an ps3 keypad working with a raspberry pi to make a portable terminal. I have finally finished my quest so join me below to see how I did it

More details  on Facelesstech blog.

Check out the video after the break.

Tutorial: Setting up a low cost QRP (FT8, JT9, WSPR etc) monitoring station with an RTL-SDR v3 and Raspberry pi 3

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A detailed tutorial on how to set up a cheap QRP monitoring station using an RTL-SDR V3 and a Raspberry Pi 3 from rtl-sdr.com

This tutorial is inspired by dg0opk’s videos and blog post on monitoring QRP with single board computers. We’ll show you how to set up a super cheap QRP monitoring station using an RTL-SDR V3 and a Raspberry Pi 3. The total cost should be about US $56 ($21 for the RTL-SDR V3, and $35 for the Pi 3).
With this setup you’ll be able to continuously monitor multiple modes within the same band simultaneously (e.g. monitor 20 meter FT8, JT65+JT9 and WSPR all on one dongle at the same time). The method for creating multiple channels in Linux may also be useful for other applications. If you happen to have an upconverter or a better SDR to dedicate to monitoring such as an SDRplay or an Airspy HF+, then this can substitute for the RTL-SDR V3 as well.

More details at rtl-sdr.com.

PI serial adaptor

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Raspberry pi serial adaptor from Facelesstech:

If you spend a lot of time building things with a raspberry pi you will eventually run into the problem that you have booted your pi it’s not plugged into a tv/monitor and it’s not connected to wifi. You don’t want to just turn it off because it could corrupt the sd card so what do you do. I recently ran into this problem but luckily I had a serial adaptor on hand to hook up and tell my pi to turn off.

See the full post on his blog and the GitHub repository here.

Check out the video after the break.

Raspberry Pi GPIO programming in C

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Steve Chamberlin has written an article about Raspberry Pi GPIO programming in C:

The Raspberry Pi’s 40-pin GPIO connector often gets overlooked. Typical Pi projects use the hardware as a very small desktop PC (RetroPie, Pi-hole, media center, print server, etc), and don’t make any use of general-purpose IO pins. That’s too bad, because with a little bit of work, the Raspberry Pi can make a powerful physical computing device for many applications.

More details at Big Mess o’ Wires homepage.

Raspberry Pi virtual floppy for ISA (PC XT/AT) computers

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Dr. Scott M. Baker wrote an article detailing how he turned a Raspberry Pi into a virtual storage device for ISA bus computers:

I’m tired of carrying compact flash cards and/or floppies back and forth to my XT computer. I like to do development at my desk using my modern windows PC. While I can certainly use a KVM switch to interact with the retro computer from my Windows desktop, it would be a lot more convenient if I could also have a shared filesystem. There are several alternatives, from serial port solutions, to network adapters. However, I wanted something that would emulate a simple disk device, like a floppy drive, something I could even boot off of, so I implemented a virtual floppy served from a Raspberry pi.

See the full post on his blog here.

Check out the video after the break.

Converting a Seeburg 3WA wallbox into a remote for a modern music player

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Dr. Scott M. Baker wrote an article detailing how he converted a Seeburg 3WA wallbox into a media player for his homebuilt audio player:

A bit of background. These Wallboxes were used as remotes in diners and other locations back in the 1950s. You put your nickel, dime, or quarter into the Wallbox, which racks up some credits. Then you select the song you want and the Wallbox sends a signal to the Jukebox, which adds your selection to the queue. Soon thereafter your music is playing through the diner. I’m too young to have experienced these in person when they were state of the art, but I do have an appreciation for antique and retro projects.
A new fad is to convert these wallboxes into remotes for your home audio system, be it Sonos or something else. I have my own homebuilt audio system, basically an augmented Pandora player, so my goal was to use the wallbox to control that.

See the full post on his blog here.

Check out the video after the break.

ZeroBoy – A poor man’s retropie “portable”

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A nice build log of ZeroBoy portable retropie project, that is available on Github:

You know when you see something and it give you instant inspiration and you also see a few ways you would also improve it. The thing I seen was wonky resistor score zero it’s basically a raspberry pi “hat” that has buttons in the layout of a nes controller. What I first thought was to make my own “hat” but flip it 180 degrees and add pass though pins so I could add a screen on top of that. Joint me below for my journey I went though.

More details at Facelesstech site.

Check out the video after the break.

Building a Midi hat and jukebox using the Raspberry Pi

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Dr. Scott M. Baker has published a new build:

I picked up a Roland SC-55 to use with my retrocomputer setup recently, and I figured it would be cool to turn the thing into a standalone midi jukebox, so that no “computer” is required. I also figured this would be relatively easy, using a raspberry pi as the controller to drive the SC-55. My first step was to figure out how to get MIDI out from a raspberry pi. One option would have been to purchase a USB-MIDI adapter. This would have worked, but I really wanted to develop a native raspberry pi MIDI interface rather than using USB. MIDI is a fairly simple interface, and the raspberry pi has built in serial capability, so this ought not to be too difficult.

Project details can be found on Dr. Scott M. Baker’s blog.

Check out the video after the break.

The Boat PC – a marine based Raspberry Pi project

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Domipheus has published a new build:

In late 2015 I was doing my usual head-scratching about what gifts to get various family members for the holiday season. My wife mentioned making something electronic for my father-in-laws boat, and after a few hours of collecting thoughts came up with an idea:

  • A Raspberry Pi computer, which could be powered off the boats 12v batteries
  • This computer would have sensors which made sense on a boat. Certainly GPS
  • I’d have some software which collated the sensor data and displayed it nicely
  • This could plug into the onboard TV using HDMI
  • It would all be put into a suitable enclosure

Project info at Domipheus Labs homepage.