Raspberry Pi virtual floppy for ISA (PC XT/AT) computers

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Dr. Scott M. Baker wrote an article detailing how he turned a Raspberry Pi into a virtual storage device for ISA bus computers:

I’m tired of carrying compact flash cards and/or floppies back and forth to my XT computer. I like to do development at my desk using my modern windows PC. While I can certainly use a KVM switch to interact with the retro computer from my Windows desktop, it would be a lot more convenient if I could also have a shared filesystem. There are several alternatives, from serial port solutions, to network adapters. However, I wanted something that would emulate a simple disk device, like a floppy drive, something I could even boot off of, so I implemented a virtual floppy served from a Raspberry pi.

See the full post on his blog here.

Check out the video after the break.

Converting a Seeburg 3WA wallbox into a remote for a modern music player

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Dr. Scott M. Baker wrote an article detailing how he converted a Seeburg 3WA wallbox into a media player for his homebuilt audio player:

A bit of background. These Wallboxes were used as remotes in diners and other locations back in the 1950s. You put your nickel, dime, or quarter into the Wallbox, which racks up some credits. Then you select the song you want and the Wallbox sends a signal to the Jukebox, which adds your selection to the queue. Soon thereafter your music is playing through the diner. I’m too young to have experienced these in person when they were state of the art, but I do have an appreciation for antique and retro projects.
A new fad is to convert these wallboxes into remotes for your home audio system, be it Sonos or something else. I have my own homebuilt audio system, basically an augmented Pandora player, so my goal was to use the wallbox to control that.

See the full post on his blog here.

Check out the video after the break.

ZeroBoy – A poor man’s retropie “portable”

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A nice build log of ZeroBoy portable retropie project, that is available on Github:

You know when you see something and it give you instant inspiration and you also see a few ways you would also improve it. The thing I seen was wonky resistor score zero it’s basically a raspberry pi “hat” that has buttons in the layout of a nes controller. What I first thought was to make my own “hat” but flip it 180 degrees and add pass though pins so I could add a screen on top of that. Joint me below for my journey I went though.

More details at Facelesstech site.

Check out the video after the break.

Building a Midi hat and jukebox using the Raspberry Pi

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Dr. Scott M. Baker has published a new build:

I picked up a Roland SC-55 to use with my retrocomputer setup recently, and I figured it would be cool to turn the thing into a standalone midi jukebox, so that no “computer” is required. I also figured this would be relatively easy, using a raspberry pi as the controller to drive the SC-55. My first step was to figure out how to get MIDI out from a raspberry pi. One option would have been to purchase a USB-MIDI adapter. This would have worked, but I really wanted to develop a native raspberry pi MIDI interface rather than using USB. MIDI is a fairly simple interface, and the raspberry pi has built in serial capability, so this ought not to be too difficult.

Project details can be found on Dr. Scott M. Baker’s blog.

Check out the video after the break.

The Boat PC – a marine based Raspberry Pi project

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Domipheus has published a new build:

In late 2015 I was doing my usual head-scratching about what gifts to get various family members for the holiday season. My wife mentioned making something electronic for my father-in-laws boat, and after a few hours of collecting thoughts came up with an idea:

  • A Raspberry Pi computer, which could be powered off the boats 12v batteries
  • This computer would have sensors which made sense on a boat. Certainly GPS
  • I’d have some software which collated the sensor data and displayed it nicely
  • This could plug into the onboard TV using HDMI
  • It would all be put into a suitable enclosure

Project info at Domipheus Labs homepage.

MQTT Mosquitto on a Pi Zero W in under 5 minutes // MickMake QuickBits

Setting up the Mosquitto MQTT Broker is pretty easy. In this video I’ll show you how to setup a Broker in under 5 minutes. Updating Raspbian If you followed my previous article on installing Raspbian without a keyboard or screen, Continue reading MQTT Mosquitto on a Pi Zero W in under 5 minutes // MickMake QuickBits

The post MQTT Mosquitto on a Pi Zero W in under 5 minutes // MickMake QuickBits appeared first on MickMake.

Raspberry Pi soft power controller – the circuit

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James Lewis has been working on a Raspberry Pi soft power controller, that is available on github:

The RetroPie project enables retro-gaming with a Raspberry Pi. All of the Pi models have enough computing power to emulate the major 8-bit and 16-bit computers of the 80s and 90s. With the Pi 3 I have even been able to play PS1 games with no problem. My current project is to put my Raspberry Pi running RetroPie into an old Super Famicom (SFC), or SNES, case. The catch? I want the original SPST power switch to work. And by work, I mean allow the Raspberry Pi to shutdown properly when the switch goes into the off position.  To accomplish this task, I am building a Raspberry Pi soft power controller.

More details at baldengineer.com.

Using Python to store data from many BLE devices

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Erich Styger has written an article describing a technique he used to collect and store data from several BLE devices with Raspberry Pi and Python scripting:

BLE (Bluetooth Low Energy) sensor devices like the Hexiwear are great, but they cannot store a large amount of data. For a research project I have to collect data from many BLE devices for later processing. What I’m using is a Python script running on the Raspberry Pi which collects the data and stores it on a file

More details at mcuoneclipse.com.

Build your very own drink mixing robot

Yu Jiang Tham designed and built his own bartender robot named Bar Mixvah, that is available on Github:

I built a robot that mixes drinks named Bar Mixvah.  It utilizes an Arduino microcontroller switching a series of pumps via transistors on the physical layer, and the MEAN stack (MongoDB, Express.js, Angular.js, Node.js) and jQuery for the frontend and backend.  In this post, I’ll teach you how I made it.  You can follow along and build one just like it!

Check out Yu Jiang’s 3-part blog post here: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3.

Raspberry Pi Launches Compute Module 3

The forgotten child of the Raspberry Pi family finally has an update. The Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 has been launched.

The Pi 3 Compute Module was teased all the way back in July, and what we knew then is just about what we know now. The new Compute Module is based on the BCM2837 processor – the same as found in the Raspberry Pi 3 – running at 1.2 GHz with 1 gigabyte of RAM. The basic form factor SODIMM form factor remains the same between the old and new Compute Modules, although the new version is 1 mm taller.

The Compute Module 3 comes with four gigabytes of eMMC Flash and sells for $30 on element14 and RS Components. There’s also a cost-reduced version called the Compute Module 3 Light that forgoes the eMMC Flash and instead breaks out those pins to the connector, allowing platform integrators to put an SD card or Flash chip on a daughter (mother?) board. The CM3 Lite version sells for $25.

The Compute Module was always the black sheep of the Raspberry Pi family, although it did find a few applications in its desired use case. The Raspberry Pi Foundation heralded NEC’s announcement of a line of large-format displays using the Compute Module recently. The OTTO, from Next Thing Co., makers of the C.H.I.P. single board computer, also had a Pi Compute Module shoved in its brain. Whether or not companies will choose the Compute Module 3 as a platform remains up in the air, but the value proposition is there; the Pi 3 is a vastly superior computational platform compared to the Pi 1. Putting this power on an easy-to-use module will make for some very interesting products.

If you’re looking for a really cool project for the Compute Module 3, I would suggest a cluster of Pis. The problem with a cluster of Compute Modules is that nearly all SODIMM sockets are horizontal, and for maximum efficiency, you’ll want a vertical header. The good news is vertical SODIMM headers do exist, and you can buy 20% of the world’s supply of these headers for about $500. I know because I did.


Filed under: news, Raspberry Pi