Binary clock

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Frederick Vandenbosch made a binary clock with Raspberry Pi Zero and Unicorn pHAT. He documented the whole process on his blog:

At the center of the project are a PiZero and a Unicorn pHAT. The PiZero fetches the time, converts it to binary and controls the Unicorn pHAT with a Python script. The Unicorn pHAT’s RGB LED matrix can be used to display those binary values in any colour.

Check out the video after the break.

An open source 3D Scanner made with Raspberry Pi

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Boris Landoni from Open Electronics writes about a new open source 3D Scanner made with Raspberry Pi:

This being said, we may move on to talk about our 3D scan approach, that consists in using a linear laser, that is, one capable of drawing a vertical line having a constant luminous intensity, and in shooting the images that have been determined by the light’s reflection on the object’s surface (that in this case is rotated) by means of a video camera; at each rotation degree (or fraction) corresponds a frame that is digitized and sent to a program capable of processing the surface of the scanned object. Usually, in these systems two lasers (tilted with respect to each other) are used, and the video camera is placed between the two. Our scanner is born out of an elaboration of the PiClop, an open project composed of a mechanics (whose parts to be 3D printed may be downloaded from thingiverse ) and of an electronics formed of the Raspberry Pi 2 board and its video camera; PiClop, as implied by the name, is a free interpretation, based on Ciclop’s Raspberry Pi 2 , a 3D commercial laser scanner and a video camera, supplied with a rotating plate.

Full details at Open Electronics project page.

Homebrew Raspberry pi shutdown button

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Facelesstech made his own Raspberry pi shutdown button and wrote a post on his blog detailing its assembly:

One thing I learn from my last shut down button was that the raspberry pi has internal pull up resistors so I didn’t need a 10k and a 1k pull up resistor on this design. This would save me a lot of space and pins on the new revision.
The reason I have decided to use these pins is that it doesn’t block any important pins you might be wanting to use during prototype of your project. All the other shut down buttons cover over the pins at the top of the header which include the SPI pins and most of the power pins. I have to admit mine doesn’t seam to be a bit more difficult to place in the correct place but I think that its a small price to pay for not having the important pins covered.

More details at Facelesstech blog.

Pi Zero POV

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Francesco over at Garage Tech posted a detailed how-to on building a Raspberry Pi Zero POV setup to display text from a file using an LED:

The most important part of getting the Pi Zero POV to run smoothly is given by how do you fix the payload of this spinning rocket onto the CD. Placing the Pi Zero in the right place will make so that when turning, the whole setup will have as little as possible vibrations. The rule of thumb we followed was to drill two 3 mm holes on opposite sides of the central hole of the CD and so that they would sit on one of the disk diameters.

Full details at Garage Tech homepage.

Using a Bus Pirate to connect to a Raspberry Pi

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Scott Dixon describes on his website how he used the Bus Pirate to connect to a Raspberry Pi:

The other day I found myself with a Rasberry Pi that I wanted to use but I had forgotten my FTDI UART cable. What I did have is my Bus Pirate v3.6 and I found it was pretty easy to use it’s transpartent UART bridge macro to connect to the Pi.

More details at 0x20 homepage.

Get your own handy Bus Pirate for $30, including world-wide shipping. Also available from our friendly distributors.

Raspberry Pi web server using flask to control GPIOs

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Rui Santos from Random Nerd Tutorials writes:

In this project you’ll create a standalone web server with a Raspberry Pi that can toggle two LEDs. You can replace those LEDs with any output (like a relay or a transistor).
In order to create the web server you will be using a Python microframework called Flask.

More details at Random Nerd Tutorials homepage.

Check out the video after the break.

BeagleBone Black GPIO Benchmark

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Joonas Pihlajamaa from Code and Life writes, ” I’ve previously made a GPIO benchmark of Raspberry Pi 1 and 2, and have always wanted to see how BeagleBone Black would stack against the Pis. I recently got one so the obvious thing to do was to see how fast the little thing could go.  Turns out, the little thing needed a bit more work than the Pi, but the results were quite interesting.”

More details at Code and Life homepage.

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