Linear Nixie tube HAT for the Raspberry Pi

Mark Smith has been working on a HAT for the Raspberry Pi that can drive two IN-9 or IN-13 linear Nixie tubes:

This project as described in www.surfncircuits.com came about because I needed a retro looking linear meter for my espresso maker water tank. I’m always running out of water in my espresso maker, and a cool display letting me know how much water is left and to let me know when to fill it up is definitely needed. In this project, I’ll create a HAT for the Raspberry Pi that can drive two IN-9 or IN-13 linear Nixie tubes. While I’m using this HAT as a single water meter display, this same linear display would be great for showing temperature, bar graphs, audio VU meters, even surf heights by days of the week. The Nixie Tube Power Supply, designed in an earlier blog will work perfectly to drive up to four of the IN-13 Nixie tubes or one IN-9 Nixie tube.

More details on surfncircuits blog and the GitHub repository here.

The Script

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Peter Scargill’s Script:

Regular readers will know about the script that Aidan Ruff and I originally developed to put Node-Red and several other packages onto the Raspberry Pi for our own home control purposes. This has been developed with help from several people and in particular my friend Antonio “Mr Shark”.
WELL – here is the script which is intended to help set-up certain Raspbian, Debian or similarly-based SBCs which now includes logging and handling Raspbian Buster (tested on Raspberry Pi 2, 3, 3B+, 4 with Stretch, 3B+ and 4 with Buster). As well as it’s original purpose of setting up a Raspberry Pi, the script also runs well with several other boards. See right hand side of the above image for what the script does, given a basic operating system install. We currently suggest NOT using this with DIET PI, original Pi or the Raspberry Pi Zero as we are no longer testing either and the latter pair are just TOO SLOW.

See the full post on Scargill’s Tech Blog.

Check out the video after the break.

Building a bluetooth DAC with Raspberry Pi Zero W

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Sami Pietikainen has written an article detailing the build of his Bluetooth DAC using Raspberry Pi Zero W:

My car comes with a built-in Bluetooth hands-free but unfortunately it does not support audio streaming. Luckily there is an AUX input available which uses a regular 3,5 mm jack. Perfect opportunity for a DIY project. I built the Bluetooth DAC using Raspberry Pi Zero W and a DAC hat. This post depicts the details of this project.

See the full post on Page Fault Blog.

PocketPi MK2

img_20190518_140600 A smaller thinner PocketPi from Facelesstech:

Thinner with a simpler design but packing the same feature as before. At its heart is a raspberry pi zero W with a 3.5″ screen 480×320. It has all the GPIO pins available what aren’t being used by the screen. Its powered by a 2500mAh battery and has one full sized usb port. Its controlled by a bluetooth keyboard with trackpad

More details on Facelesstech blog.

Check out the video after the break.

Building a Raspberry Pi UPS and serial login console with tinyK22 (NXP K22FN512)

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Erich Styger has been working on a UPS with the Raspberry Pi to cover a short power out:

There are different ways to ruin a Linux system. For the Raspberry Pi which uses a micro SD card as the storage device by default, it comes with two challenges:
1.Excessive writes to the SD card can wear it out
2.Sudden power failure during a SD card write can corrupt the file system
For problem one I do I have a mitigation strategy (see “Log2Ram: Extending SD Card Lifetime for Raspberry Pi LoRaWAN Gateway“). Problem two can occur by user error (“you shall not turn it off without a sudo poweroff!”) or with the event of a power outage or black out. So for that problem I wanted to build a UPS for the Raspberry Pi.

Project info on MCU on Eclipse site.

The Nixie tube filadometer – a Nixie tube filament meter for your 3D printer

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Dr. Scott M. Baker made a Nixie tube filament meter for his 3D Printer:

First, I decided to upgrade from the Raspberry Pi Model B to a more recent Raspberry Pi Zero W that I had on hand. Wired Ethernet is so ~ 2013 after all, and wireless would be a lot more convenient. Next, I designed a 3D printed case for it, as my old laser-cut-acrylic-and-glue case also looked very dated. Finally, I replaced the software with a new program designed to poll the data from my octoprint server. In less than an afternoon, I had turned the old temperature/humidity display into something useful.

See the full post on his blog.

Check out the video after the break.

Open Trickler: The DIY smart powder trickler

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Eric Higgins has a nice build log on his Open Trickler project a bluetooth-enabled smart powder trickler from off-the-shelf parts for under $60:

Fundamentally, this is not a hard problem to solve. Read the value from the scale, run a motor that moves powder into the scale, turn off the motor when the scale reads the target weight. As with many projects, the devil’s in the details and there was plenty of trial-and-error during the development process to reach a working prototype.
In this project, a Raspberry Pi is used to read the weight from the scale and run a small vibration motor (like those in mobile phones) to trickle powder. An app on your phone or tablet connects to the Raspberry Pi over Bluetooth, and is used to set the target weight and start/stop the automatic trickling process.

See the full post on Ammolytics blog.

Check out the video after the break.

RetroZero (retropie handheld)

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Facelesstech published a new build:

I’ve been on a quest for while now trying to build a retropie handheld that was functional but didn’t break the bank. So far I’ve made ZeroBoy – A poor man’s retropie “portable” and a follow-up ZeroBoy rev C – An improved poor mans retropie portable. These were great but I think I have made a much better system with all the features included.

More details  on Facelesstech blog.

Check out the video after the break.

Tiny particle sensor node with decorative case

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Lucky Resistor published a new build:

This article is about a small sensor node with a decorative case. It is based on the Raspberry Pi Zero W board with a custom sensor shield on top.
I publish all hardware files for a simple version of the sensor, so you should be able to build this kind of sensor nodes and use it to monitor anything you like. You can also extend/modify the design easily with additional sensors. Nevertheless, the case lid design is based around the Plantower PMSA003 particle sensor. It has all required air vents for this use.

More details on Lucky Resistor homepage.

Raspberry Pi based indoor air quality monitor

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Dr. Scott M. Baker made this Pi-based environmental monitor and wrote a post on his blog detailing its assembly:

For years I’ve followed the “uRadMonitor”, a device that does air quality monitoring and radiation monitoring. I’ve played with geiger counter projects before and frankly found them to be not very interesting. However, the idea of monitoring air quality is something that seemed like it might yield interesting data. For example, as I’ve started to become involved in 3D printing, it would be useful to see whether or not 3D printing affected the air quality. It would also be useful to correlate my results with what my region reports for outdoor air quality.

Check out the video after the break.