Making an e-Paper Etch-a-Sketch

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Scott Baker has been working on making an Etch-a-Sketch using modern e-Paper displays and optical encoders:

Above you can see my prototype. I’m using a 4.2″ e-Paper display from Gooddisplay, together with the Waveshare breakout board. I have a couple of ENS1J-B28-R00128 optical encoders that I attained on eBay. I specifically chose these encoders instead of traditional electro-mechnical encoders due to the high numbers of pulses per revolution. A typical electro-mechanical encoder will net about 24 pulses per revolution. The optical encoders I bought on ebay are 128 pulses per revolution. Our 4.2″ ePaper has 400×300 pixels. To traverse the major axis would require 16 full turns of the electromechical encoder but only 3 turns of the optical encoder.
The hardware is so simple that there’s not much more to say. The encoders are connected to GPIO pins of a Raspberry Pi. Note that there are resistors inline on the encoder outputs as the encoders are 5V and the Raspberry Pi uses 3.3V GPIO. The e-ink display is connected to the SPI bus.

See the full post on his blog here and the GitHub repository here.

Check out the video after the break.

Project PITA: Build a mini mass deauther using Bettercap and a Raspberry Pi Zero W

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evilsocket shared a how-to on making a mini WiFi deauthenticator using Bettercap and a Raspberry Pi Zero W:

A few days ago I started playing with some idea I had from a few weeks already, using a Raspberry Pi Zero W to make a mini WiFi deauthenticator: something in my pocket that periodically jumps on all the channels in the WiFi spectrum, collects information about the nearby access points and their connected clients and then sends a deauthentication packet to each one of them, resulting in some sort of WiFi jammer on the 802.11 level. As an interesting “side effect” of this jammer (the initial intent was purely for the lulz) is that the more it deauths, the higher the changes to also sniff WPA2 handshakes.

See the full post on Evilsocket blog.

Pocket Pi

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A Raspberry pi zero w pocket terminal project from Facelesstech, that is available on Github:

So if you have been following my blog lately you may have noticed me rambling on about trying to get a Xbox 360 chat pad and an ps3 keypad working with a raspberry pi to make a portable terminal. I have finally finished my quest so join me below to see how I did it

More details  on Facelesstech blog.

Check out the video after the break.

Pi-powered Atari 5200 multi-ROM cartridge (MultiCart)

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Dr. Scott M. Baker has a nice write-up about building a multi-ROM cartridge for his Atari 5200 using Raspberry Pi:

The Atari 5200 is a vintage gaming system from the early 1980s. At the time I owned a 2600, but I always wanted a 5200. Well, in 2018 I finally decided to find one on eBay and buy it. I learned that the first thing you want to do after attaining a new gaming console is to get your hands on every available game cartridge for it, so I made this multi-ROM cartridge.
A multi-ROM cartridge, or “MultiCart” is a cartridge that contains more than one ROM image. There are multiple ways to go about this from selector switches to pick the cartridge you want, to built-in in game menu systems. I decided to go the route of using a Raspberry Pi for the user interface, making a WEB UI available to pick which cartridge is used.
The goal is not simply to play retro games on modern hardware — there’s any number of emulation solutions for that. The goal is to play retro games on retro hardware, but use a modern system to load the game image into the console.

See the full post at smbaker.com and the GitHub repository here.

Check out the video after the break.

Tutorial: Setting up a low cost QRP (FT8, JT9, WSPR etc) monitoring station with an RTL-SDR v3 and Raspberry pi 3

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A detailed tutorial on how to set up a cheap QRP monitoring station using an RTL-SDR V3 and a Raspberry Pi 3 from rtl-sdr.com

This tutorial is inspired by dg0opk’s videos and blog post on monitoring QRP with single board computers. We’ll show you how to set up a super cheap QRP monitoring station using an RTL-SDR V3 and a Raspberry Pi 3. The total cost should be about US $56 ($21 for the RTL-SDR V3, and $35 for the Pi 3).
With this setup you’ll be able to continuously monitor multiple modes within the same band simultaneously (e.g. monitor 20 meter FT8, JT65+JT9 and WSPR all on one dongle at the same time). The method for creating multiple channels in Linux may also be useful for other applications. If you happen to have an upconverter or a better SDR to dedicate to monitoring such as an SDRplay or an Airspy HF+, then this can substitute for the RTL-SDR V3 as well.

More details at rtl-sdr.com.

PI serial adaptor

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Raspberry pi serial adaptor from Facelesstech:

If you spend a lot of time building things with a raspberry pi you will eventually run into the problem that you have booted your pi it’s not plugged into a tv/monitor and it’s not connected to wifi. You don’t want to just turn it off because it could corrupt the sd card so what do you do. I recently ran into this problem but luckily I had a serial adaptor on hand to hook up and tell my pi to turn off.

See the full post on his blog and the GitHub repository here.

Check out the video after the break.

Raspberry Pi GPIO programming in C

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Steve Chamberlin has written an article about Raspberry Pi GPIO programming in C:

The Raspberry Pi’s 40-pin GPIO connector often gets overlooked. Typical Pi projects use the hardware as a very small desktop PC (RetroPie, Pi-hole, media center, print server, etc), and don’t make any use of general-purpose IO pins. That’s too bad, because with a little bit of work, the Raspberry Pi can make a powerful physical computing device for many applications.

More details at Big Mess o’ Wires homepage.

Banana Pi DLNA media server

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Dilshan Jayakody published a new build:

Couple of months back we decided to create our own media server to store our MP3s and digital photographs. But it gets postpone several months due to unavailability of main-boards and other resources. Finally, after reviewing several prototypes we decided to build our media server using Banana Pi (BPI) and MiniDLNA. Before finalize BPI we checked several main-boards which including Raspberry Pi B+, Orange Pi One and BeagleBone Black. Out of all above main-boards we choose BPI M1 because of its inbuilt SATA2.0 interface, Gigabit Ethernet port and availability in local market.

See the full post on his blog here.

Retropie plug in USB speaker

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A detailed instructions of how to make this DIY retropie plug in usb speaker from Facelesstech:

The 2 down sides to my ZeroBoy build I did recently were that it didn’t have a build in battery power and that it didn’t have sound. I seen that the MintyPi was using a USB sound card to give their handheld a speaker by soldering a speaker to the 3.5mm jack. So I thought I could do the same to add sound to my ZeroBoy.

Check out the video after the break.