The Boat PC – a marine based Raspberry Pi project

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Domipheus has published a new build:

In late 2015 I was doing my usual head-scratching about what gifts to get various family members for the holiday season. My wife mentioned making something electronic for my father-in-laws boat, and after a few hours of collecting thoughts came up with an idea:

  • A Raspberry Pi computer, which could be powered off the boats 12v batteries
  • This computer would have sensors which made sense on a boat. Certainly GPS
  • I’d have some software which collated the sensor data and displayed it nicely
  • This could plug into the onboard TV using HDMI
  • It would all be put into a suitable enclosure

Project info at Domipheus Labs homepage.

Raspberry Pi soft power controller – the circuit

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James Lewis has been working on a Raspberry Pi soft power controller, that is available on github:

The RetroPie project enables retro-gaming with a Raspberry Pi. All of the Pi models have enough computing power to emulate the major 8-bit and 16-bit computers of the 80s and 90s. With the Pi 3 I have even been able to play PS1 games with no problem. My current project is to put my Raspberry Pi running RetroPie into an old Super Famicom (SFC), or SNES, case. The catch? I want the original SPST power switch to work. And by work, I mean allow the Raspberry Pi to shutdown properly when the switch goes into the off position.  To accomplish this task, I am building a Raspberry Pi soft power controller.

More details at baldengineer.com.

Homebrew PiHPSDR

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g4fre built his own PIHPSDR, that is available at github:

Having seen the Apache-labs version of the PIHPSDR I wanted to customise it to fill my needs, so I needed to build my own
All the needed information , with the software, is at John Melton’s github site github.com/g0orx/pihpsdr The hardware shopping list includes. RaspberryPi 3, 7″ Official Raspberry Pi LCD, 8 push buttons, 4 rotary encoders, case and power supply.
All the items were mounted in a 12x7x2″ aluminium case obtained from Mouser, The display was held in place with plastic channel finishing strips from B&Q.

More details at g4fre radio blog.

MeArm Pi – Build your own Raspberry Pi powered robot arm!

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Here’s an interesting open source project on Kickstarter the world’s first robot arm kit for the Raspberry Pi, the MeArm Pi:

We believe in helping people understand how the world works. With so much development going on in robotics at the moment, now is the perfect time to get to know what it takes to build your own robot. The MeArm Pi is an award winning robotic arm kit that’s simple enough for a child to assemble. It integrates directly with the Raspberry Pi you know and love and you can either control it directly using the on-board joysticks or by programming it from the Pi in your favourite programming language.

Take control of the world around you.

You can visit the project’s Kickstart page and their website Mime Industries for more info.

Check out the video after the break.

 

Raspberry Pi RF frequency counter

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A Raspberry PI RF frequency counter project from Scott Harden, that is available on GitHub:

Raspberry PI RF Frequency Counter with Python Interface. The RF signal clocks a 32-bit counter (SN74LV8154) connected to a 16-bit IO expander (MCP23017) accessable to the Raspberry Pi (via I²C) to provide real-time frequency measurements from a python script.

More details at Scott Harden’s blog.

Binary clock

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Frederick Vandenbosch made a binary clock with Raspberry Pi Zero and Unicorn pHAT. He documented the whole process on his blog:

At the center of the project are a PiZero and a Unicorn pHAT. The PiZero fetches the time, converts it to binary and controls the Unicorn pHAT with a Python script. The Unicorn pHAT’s RGB LED matrix can be used to display those binary values in any colour.

Check out the video after the break.

An open source 3D Scanner made with Raspberry Pi

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Boris Landoni from Open Electronics writes about a new open source 3D Scanner made with Raspberry Pi:

This being said, we may move on to talk about our 3D scan approach, that consists in using a linear laser, that is, one capable of drawing a vertical line having a constant luminous intensity, and in shooting the images that have been determined by the light’s reflection on the object’s surface (that in this case is rotated) by means of a video camera; at each rotation degree (or fraction) corresponds a frame that is digitized and sent to a program capable of processing the surface of the scanned object. Usually, in these systems two lasers (tilted with respect to each other) are used, and the video camera is placed between the two. Our scanner is born out of an elaboration of the PiClop, an open project composed of a mechanics (whose parts to be 3D printed may be downloaded from thingiverse ) and of an electronics formed of the Raspberry Pi 2 board and its video camera; PiClop, as implied by the name, is a free interpretation, based on Ciclop’s Raspberry Pi 2 , a 3D commercial laser scanner and a video camera, supplied with a rotating plate.

Full details at Open Electronics project page.

Homebrew Raspberry pi shutdown button

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Facelesstech made his own Raspberry pi shutdown button and wrote a post on his blog detailing its assembly:

One thing I learn from my last shut down button was that the raspberry pi has internal pull up resistors so I didn’t need a 10k and a 1k pull up resistor on this design. This would save me a lot of space and pins on the new revision.
The reason I have decided to use these pins is that it doesn’t block any important pins you might be wanting to use during prototype of your project. All the other shut down buttons cover over the pins at the top of the header which include the SPI pins and most of the power pins. I have to admit mine doesn’t seam to be a bit more difficult to place in the correct place but I think that its a small price to pay for not having the important pins covered.

More details at Facelesstech blog.

Pi Zero POV

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Francesco over at Garage Tech posted a detailed how-to on building a Raspberry Pi Zero POV setup to display text from a file using an LED:

The most important part of getting the Pi Zero POV to run smoothly is given by how do you fix the payload of this spinning rocket onto the CD. Placing the Pi Zero in the right place will make so that when turning, the whole setup will have as little as possible vibrations. The rule of thumb we followed was to drill two 3 mm holes on opposite sides of the central hole of the CD and so that they would sit on one of the disk diameters.

Full details at Garage Tech homepage.

Using a Bus Pirate to connect to a Raspberry Pi

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Scott Dixon describes on his website how he used the Bus Pirate to connect to a Raspberry Pi:

The other day I found myself with a Rasberry Pi that I wanted to use but I had forgotten my FTDI UART cable. What I did have is my Bus Pirate v3.6 and I found it was pretty easy to use it’s transpartent UART bridge macro to connect to the Pi.

More details at 0x20 homepage.

Get your own handy Bus Pirate for $30, including world-wide shipping. Also available from our friendly distributors.