Building a Power-over-Ethernet (PoE) power supply using a DPS5005 module

Dr. Scott M. Baker has designed and built a PoE-powered lab power supply using a DPS5005 and custom PoE board:

The DPS5005 is a DC-DC converter. It can accept an input voltage from 0 to about 55 volts or so, and will regulate an output voltage up to about 1 volt below the input. This version is good to 5 amps, but there are other versions of this supply that will do as little as 30V / 2A and as much as 50V / 20A. 50V 5A seems like a good sweet spot. Since it is a DC-DC converter, you have to have a DC source to drive it. A lot of people use a 48V power brick, as they are commonly available.

Project info at smbaker.com.

Check out the video after the break.

Teardown of an Amrel PPS 35-2 programmable power supply

Kerry D. Wong did teardown on a single-channel Amrel PPS 35-2 programmable power supply:

A while back, I did a teardown on a dual-channel Amrel PPS-2322 programmable power supply, and was quite impressed by its solid construction. Recently, I found another Amrel power supply on eBay and this time it is a single channel version (PPS 35-2). Let’s take a look inside this signal channel version and see how much in common it has compared to the dual channel 2322.
The single channel version of the Amrel programmable power supply has front panel sensing terminals making it handy for remote sensing applications. Although the dual channel version has remote sensing capability as well it is only available through wiring at the rear terminal block so it is less convenient.

More details on Kerry D. Wong blog. You can see the teardown of an PPS 2322 dual channel power supply here.

Check out the video after the break.

Understanding and repairing the power supply from a 1969 analog computer

Ken Shirriff writes:

We recently started restoring a vintage1 analog computer. Unlike a digital computer that represents numbers with discrete binary values, an analog computer performs computations using physical, continuously changeable values such as voltages. Since the accuracy of the results depends on the accuracy of these voltages, a precision power supply is critical in an analog computer. This blog post discusses how this computer’s power supply works, and how we fixed a problem with it. This is the second post in the series; the first post discussed the precision op amps in the computer.

More details at righto.com.

APP NOTE: Give your voltage regulator the margin it deserves

Texas instruments has an app note and video explaining how to make a programmable output power supply using a typical LDO voltage regulator and a DAC. This is the technique we used for the Bus Pirate Ultra power supply to get 0.8 to 5volts output, and it works a treat!

Consider the currents going in and out of the VFB node shown in Figure 3, which is connected to the ADJ pin of the LDO. Almost no current flows in or out the device through the ADJ pin (on the order of 0.01µA). As I previously mentioned, the output voltage of the LDO is always produced such that the voltage at the ADJ pin – and therefore the VFB node – is equal to the LDO’s internal reference voltage. Thus, the current through R2 is constant. It follows that any sourcing or sinking of current by the DAC through R3 is reflected as a proportional voltage increase or decrease at VOUT to compensate for the changing current that must flow through R1.

App note: FPGA power supply considerations

App note from Vishay Siliconix, giving us tips on powering FPGAs. Link here (PDF)

An FPGA is a device that offers many logic elements – up to 1 million gates in a single device at this writing – as well as other functionality such as transceivers, PLLs, and MAC units for complex processing. FPGAs are becoming very powerful, and the need to power the devices effectively is a key, if often underestimated, part of the design. A straightforward power supply design process can significantly reduce the number of required design iterations for the OEM designer.

Teardown and modification of an Electrophoresis power supply

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Kerry Wong did a teardown of an EC600-90 electrophoresis high voltage power supply:

Electrophoresis power supplies are commonly found in biology and other life sciences laboratories. These power supplies are usually capable of supplying high voltages and high currents required for gel electrophoresis–a method used for separating DNA, RNA and other protein fragments based on their size and charge. There are many used electrophoresis power supplies out there in the second hand market and can be bought quite cheaply. I am curious whether these electrophoresis power supplies are suitable for electronics lab use as a lab grade high voltage power supply can be quite expensive. So I recently picked up one from eBay to take a look.

See the full post on his blog.

Check out the video after the break.

App note: Power supply topologies – Forward of Flyback? Which is Better? Both!

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App note from Coilcraft camparing two recognized power supply topologies. Link here (PDF)

Beatles or Stones? Michael or LeBron? Deep dish or thin crust? Forward or flyback? These are just a few of the age-old questions that have been hotly debated over the years, people arguing their opinions with great vigor. But, the truth is, most of the time the answer is both, due to the merits of each.

In this article, we will focus on forward or flyback. We’ll discuss the characteristics of active clamp forward and continuous conduction flyback isolated power supply topologies and demonstrate the design and performance trade-offs of each using two telecom-oriented power supplies as examples.

App note: Addressing power supply challenges for after-market electronics and infrastructure

Addressing Power Supply Challenges for After-Market Electronics and Infrastructure

This application note discusses key market trends and customer needs that are presenting new challenges for power supply design for after-market technologies and transport infrastructure automation. This piece will also examine solutions to address these challenges, with a special emphasis on power architecture. Link here

After-market automotive products have driven remarkable innovation, from infotainment and telematics to advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS). Features like GPS, rear-view cameras, and parking sensors are now common in vehicles. There is also a continuous rollout of novel after-market technologies being developed by companies worldwide. Fleet management, on-board diagnostics, heads-up display, and freight control/monitoring are just a few examples of technologies found in cars and trucks, trains, ships, avionics, and defense applications.

13.8V 5A power supply

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Dilshan Jayakody published a new build:

13.8V power supplies are commonly used in armature radio experiments. Most of the portable armature radio transceivers are designed to work with a 13.8V power source. We mainly build this power supply unit to power some of our armature radio circuits and modules.
This design is based on the popular LM338 5A voltage regulator. We choose this regulator because of to it’s higher current rating, short-circuit protection feature and higher availability.

See the full post on his blog.

Teardown and repair of an GW Instek PSW80-40.5 1080W multi-range programmable power supply

GW Instek

Teardown and repair of an GW Instek 1080W power supply from The Signal Path:

In this episode Shahriar investigates the failure of a GW Instek 1080W power supply capable of providing up to 80V and 40A of programmable output voltage and current respectively. The power supply does not power on. However, relay noises can be heard inside the instrument during power on.
Teardown of the unit reveals a modular design with PCBs on all sides. The instrument comprises 6 different modules and 3 complete power supplies in parallel. The controller circuit is powered from the middle power supply module. Examination of the boards reveals three separate failed devices.

More details on The Signal Path site.

Check out the video after the break.