How to build your Energy Load manager

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A detailed instructions of how to build an Energy Load manager from Open Electronics:

When the instantaneous power consumption exceeds the set values, it selectively disconnects the users, in order to prevent the electric meter to cut the power to disconnect.
The management of the electricity users at home, intended as the possibility to define the operating priorities and to momentarily disconnect the ones that may be “sacrificed”, is something that has become important since the coming of the electronic meters. With respect to the traditional ones, such meters are in fact a bit less tolerant towards the overloads, and they could suddenly leave us without power. Given that nowadays the electric meter is almost always outside and that in order to rearm it we should get out of the house; not to mention that the disconnection will probably turn off the computer that is sending files via the Internet, or that a user might not be able to shut down. In order to prevent such a situation, we created the load manager: in the previous installment, we described its hardware. It is now the moment to deal with the software governing it, and with the management of its functioning via the user interface.

Project info at open-electronics.org.

Build a Multisensor Shield for ESP8266

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Rui Santos has a great write-up on building a Multisensor Shield for ESP8266, that is available on GitHub:

In this project you’ll discover how to design and create a Multisensor Shield for the ESP8266 Wemos D1 Mini board. The shield has temperature sensor (DS18B20), a PIR motion sensor, an LDR, and a terminal to connect a relay module. We’ll start by preparing all the hardware and then program it.

See the full post on Random Nerd Tutorials blog.

Grbl_ESP32 CNC development board

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Bart Dring has designed a development board for using CNC on Grbl ESP32:

This is a Grbl_ESP32 CNC Development board. This is a quick and easy way to use and test CNC on the ESP32 controller.
Grbl is a great CNC firmware that has been around for nearly a decade. It was originally designed for the Arduino UNO and basic 3 axis CNC routers, but it has been ported to other CPUs and was the basis for many other CNC and 3D printer firmwares.

Project info at Buildlog.Net Blog. It’s also up on Tindie.

Open source RISC – Eclipse with RISC-V on the SiFive HiFive1 board

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Erich Styger writes:

Open Source software has been around for decades. But open source on hardware especially microcontroller is not much a reality these days. But there is something which might change this: RISC-V is a free and open RISC instruction set architecture and for me it has the potential to replace some of the proprietary architectures currently used. RISC-V is not new, but it gets more and more traction in Academia (no surprise). Not only because it is open: Think about all the recent security issues with proprietary architectures: Spectre, Meltdown, and Foreshadow just be the most recent one.
I wanted to play with RISC-V for over a year, but finally a week ago I did one of these “hey, let’s buy that board” thing again. Sometimes these boards get on a pile to wait a few weeks or longer to get used, but that one I had to try out immediately :-).

More details on MCU on Eclipse site.

Energy Meter module to analyze the electrical grid parameters and consumption

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Boris Landoni from Open Electronics writes about a new open source energy meter project:

In the first installment, you had the opportunity of learning about our energy meter, and of learning about its details, with special attention the technical ones. Our energy meter is based on the coupling – by means of two measuring transformers – to an integrated circuit, that enables the detection of the values as for voltage and current, in addition to the corresponding phase angles, so to be able to know the real, the reactive and the apparent power, in addition to the phase angle (cosφ). We developed a software to be paired to our measuring board, so that it may be used for the configuration and calibration of the integrated circuit, and for the real-time display of the electrical measurings that it has carried out.

More details at Open-Electronics.org.  Be sure to see Part 1 here.

Open source Agilent 53132A 53131A OCXO ultra high stability oven upgrade

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Gaurav Singh made an open source 53132A OCXO Ultra stability time base, that is available on github:

While i was working with my own GPSDO project. i need to have a frequency counter with descent stability so purchased my self a Agilent 53132A which is a 12 digit frequency counter, big brother to 53131A 10 Digit Counter. Both are really nice units.
But they unusable standard Timebase. So optional oven oscillator time base need to purchase. but 53132A and 53131A both unit are no longer available for sale and neither of the Time base upgrades.

See the full post on Embedded Engineering blog.

Ethernet Relay board

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Boris Landoni from Open Electronics writes about a new open source project Ethernet Relay board:

The project we are introducing in this article wants on to take on that task by creating, through dedicated connections, the possibility to remotely control your entrance gate, your fish tank, the garden lights, the watering system and so on, using numerous examples. It is an ethernet-controlled relay board, which can be used as an actuator to directly control 220 V loads, to command 0V ÷ 5V digital signals or to read the status of digital or analog inputs; everything can be done remotely by using an Internet capable LAN.

Full details at open-electronics.org.

CANable: the open source USB to CAN adapter

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An open-source USB to CAN adapter:

It supports CAN bit-rates of up to 1 Mbit/s. The product comes with an open-source SocketCAN driver software. It features a Micro-USB connector and a 4-pin screw terminal with CAN_H, CAN_L, 5-V supply, and ground. The CANable device is a hardware clone of Eric Evenchick’s CANtact project, an open-source USB-to-CAN hardware adapter

Via Open Electronics.