DC/DC switcher for 5v TO 3v at 750mA in a TO-220 7805 footprint


An open source small DC/DC 3W switcher to drop 5V to 3V in a 7805 TO-220 pinout from Black Mesa Labs:

This post is an open source hardware design from Black Mesa Labs for a simple DC/DC converter for dropping 5V to 3.3V ( or adjustable to lower voltages via resistor selections ). The design is based on the PAM2305 from Diodes Incorporated, a great little 1 Amp step-down DC-DC converter in a small TSOT25 package. The PAM2305 supports a range of input voltages from 2.5V to 5.5V, allowing the use of a single Li+/Li-polymer cell, multiple Alkaline/NiMH cell, USB, and other standard power sources. The output voltage is adjustable from 0.6V to the input voltage.

More details at Black Mesa Labs site.

Open source 22mm diameter PCB project


An open source 22mm diameter PCB project from Concretedog, that is available on github:

So I posted a while back about how I had used these 22mm pcb’s I’d made in prototyping an ematch ignitor system for use in rocketry. Although I made these stackable boards so they would fit inside a popular size of Estes rocket body tube I’m aware that they are quite useful for lots of things. So i’ve open sourced them so anyone can get some made, or add improve or change them.
There are three boards,an Attiny85 board with some power LED and indicator LED, a SOT89 power supply board which could be built up with either a 3.3v or a 5v supply. Finally there is a “kludge” board which is useful for adding in some thru hole components into the system. Some quick pics here but in the files on Git each board is well documented in a pdf. All the dust components are 0805 so super accessible for hand SMD soldering. :)

See the full post at Concretedog blog.



Angus Ainslie writes about an open source project a CHIP Pro TNC:

So I finally have a design of the TNC I’ve been working on that I think is ready for release. Initially this started with me wanting a replacement for my mobilinkd and AP510. With feature creep it has turned into much more.
The current board has a VHF radio module, a CHIP Pro computer module running Linux ( NTC calls it gadget OS ) and a Mikrobus slot. I’m currently using the Mikrobus for a GPS module but there are lots of variants.

See the full post on his blog.

BML USB 3.0 FPGA interface over PMOD


An open-source-hardware USB 3.0 to FPGA PMOD interface design from Black Mesa Labs:

Black Mesa Labs is presenting an open-source-hardware USB 3.0 to FPGA PMOD interface design.  First off, please lower your expectations. USB 3.0 physical layer is capable of 5 Gbps, or 640 MBytes/Sec. This project can’t provide that to your FPGA over 2 PMOD connectors – not even close. It does substantially improve PC to FPGA bandwidth however, 30x for Writes and 100x for Reads compared to a standard FTDI cable based on the FT232 ( ala RS232 like UART interface at 921,600 baud ). A standard FTDI cable is $20 and the FT600 chip is less than $10, so BML deemed it a project worth pursuing.

More details at Black Mesa Labs homepage.

Via the contact form.

BML HDMI video for FPGAs over PMOD

BML HDMIvideoforFPGAs over PMOD

Here are two open-source-hardware HDMI  video boards for adding digital video to FPGA platforms with standard PMOD connectors from Black Mesa Labs:

The BML 3bit HDMI over single-PMOD uses 7 of 8 available LVCMOS 3.3 pins on a single PMOD to provide 3bit color ( R,G,B 100% On or Off ). Example Verilog design drives 800×600 using a 40 MHz dot clock. The TI TFP410 is very versatile in the resolutions it can generate and is really just limited by the clock that the FPGA can provide and the data rates the PMOD connectors are capable of.

More details at Black Mesa Labs homepage.

HydroBot: Prototyping new modules


Matthew Reed writes:

ProtoModule is a HydroBot module designed to easily develop and test new monitoring or control functions that may someday go into a HydroBot module. It has 11 GPIO pins and the power rails broken out on a 0.1” pin header for easy breadboarding or interfacing with ribbon cables. The provided pins give access to a variety of digital and analog I/O, as well as digital communication peripherals, to allow for many flexible design options.

More info at protofusion.org.

8-bit assembler compiler project

8-bit assembler compiler

Dilshan Jayakody writes, “8-bit Assembler compiler is NASM compatible assembler compiler to generate binaries for 8-bit x86 like CPUs. The binaries produced with this compiler can execute on Marco Schweighauser’s 8-bit virtual Javascript CPU.
This native compiler can build using Lazarus / FPC. During the implementation we build and test this compiler successfully on Linux and Windows operating systems.”

More details at Dilshan Jayakody’s blog.

A 2-channel receiver that can save your old Motorola TX


Boris Landoni writes about a new open source project 2-channel receiver that can save your old Motorola TX:

A 433,92 MHz Receiver that can be paired with a maximum of 10 Motorola TX each with relay outputs that can be set both in monostable or bistable mode.

Although we have had high security encoding for several years, based for instance on rolling-codes, a lot of remote controls and especially those installed long time ago in houses and other places for opening gates, are based on fixed and relatively simple encoding like the MM53200 of former National Semiconductor and the Motorola MC14502x; the latter had two new elements at the time of its introduction, that were the high (for the times) number of combinations allowed (19,683) and the three-state encoding (each encoding input of the encoder and of the decoder would allow three logic levels and required special three-state dip-switches).

More details at open-electronics.org.