App note: Reduced power dissipation of relay loads

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Another app note from ON Semiconductors on using PWM technique to reduce power consumed when latching mechanical relays. Link here (PDF)

Integrated circuit driver circuits often use relay loads in their application. Output drivers are a source of power dissipation on the IC. Latching relays can be used to keep sustaining load current at a minimum by engaging and removing drive current, but a PWM system can also preserve reduced power conditions by engaging and reducing duty cycle using standard type relays.

By considering the Maximum Turn−On Voltage and Minimum Turn−Off Voltage specifications typically quoted in the relay electrical specification, your system design can utilize a signal to pull−in and activate the relay followed by a reduced power PWM sustaining signal.

App note: The load switch – Selection and use of ecoSWITCH(TM) products

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ecoSWITCH(TM) from ON Semiconductors offers space saving solution on power distribution system. Link here (PDF)

Load switches play an important part in the management of supply domains and the protection of the loads they supply. Loads switches are often used for power sequencing, standby load leakage reduction, and inrush current control. Integrated ecoSWITCH products deliver an area reducing solution, offering over current protection, load soft start, and extremely low on series resistances of sub − 20 milliohm. This article discusses the primary benefits of load switches, application considerations, and how ecoSWITCH differs from other types of integrated switch offerings. A generic cloud system application and USB power delivery example are presented to demonstrate how the addition of ecoSWITCH solves design challenges such as achieving low quiescent current, local load protection, and startup sequencing.

App note: Recommendations to avoid short pulse width issues in HVIC gate driver applications

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Application note from ON Semiconductors discussing possible abnormalities on High voltage gate driver when operating on short pulses. Link here (PDF)

The High−Voltage Integrated Circuit (HVIC) gate driver family is designed to drive an N−channel MOSFET or IGBT up to 600 V. One of the most common methods to supply power to the high−side gate drive circuitry of the high−voltage gate drive IC is the bootstrap power supply. This bootstrap power supply technique has the advantage of being simple and low cost. However, duty cycle is limited by the requirement to charge the bootstrap capacitor and serious problems occur when extremely short pulse width is used in the application system. This application note explains the features of HVIC gate drivers and provides recommendations to avoid short pulse−width issues in the application.

App note: High voltage inverting buck reduces complexity and board space

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App note from ON semiconductors about repurposing a buck converter to produce negative voltages. Link here (PDF)

Applications in the electronics industry ranging from sensor−based designs to power amplifiers are periodically faced with the requirement to generate a negative voltage rail. Although many transformer−based designs, charge pumps and other methods have been used to meet such a requirement, the inverting buck−boost topology stands out as simple to design and can save on power and board space too.

With power budgets in many applications already stretched, and PCB real estate limited due to the high levels of functionality incorporated in many new products, power devices that use an inverting buck−boost topology can prove extremely valuable to systems designers.

A Buck regulator can be reconfigured to generate a negative output voltage from a positive input voltage using the inverting buck−boost topology. Unlike a buck regulator, the Inverting buck−boost transfers energy to the output through the output diode during the ’Off’ time. For this reason, users must keep in mind that the average output current is always less than the average inductor current.

App note: Introduction to the silicon photomultiplier (SiPM)

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App note from ON Semiconductors about SiPM sensors, explaining the working principle and primary performance parameters. Link here (PDF)

The Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) is a sensor that addresses the challenge of sensing, timing and quantifying low-light signals down to the single-photon level. Traditionally the province of the Photomultiplier Tube (PMT), the Silicon Photomultiplier now offers a highly attractive alternative that combines the low-light detection capabilities of the PMT while offering all the benefits of a solid-state sensor. The SiPM features low-voltage operation, insensitivity to magnetic fields, mechanical robustness and excellent uniformity of response. Due to these traits, the SensL® SiPM has rapidly gained a proven performance in the fields of medical imaging, hazard and threat detection, biophotonics, high energy physics and LiDAR.

App note: How to maintain USB signal integrity when adding ESD protection

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Introducing the eye diagram method in this app note from ON Semiconductors in determining signal integrity of USB lines. Link here (PDF)

The Universal Serial Bus (USB) has become a popular feature of PCs, cell phones and other electronic devices. USB makes data transfer between electronic devices faster and easier. USB 2.0 transfers data at up to 480 Mbps. At these data rates, any small amount of capacitance added will cause disturbances to the data signals. Designers are left with the challenge of finding ESD protection solutions that can protect these sensitive lines without adding signal degrading capacitance. This document will discuss USB 2.0 and evaluate the importance of low capacitance ESD protection devices with the use of eye diagrams.

App note: Low-side self-protected MOSFET

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Integrated fault protected MOSFET app note from ON Semiconductors. Link here (PDF)

The ever increasing density and complexity of automotive and industrial control electronics requires integration of components, wherever possible, so as to conserve space, reduce cost, and improve reliability. Integration of protection features with power switches continues to drive new product development. The often open environments of automotive and industrial electronics, subject to severe voltage transients, high power and high inductance loads, numerous external connections, and human intervention force the requirement of fault protection circuitry. Advancements in power MOSFET processing technology afford an economical marriage of protection features, such as current limitation, and standard MOSFET power transistor switches. This paper describes the technology and operation of ON Semiconductor’s HDPlus monolithic low-side smart MOSFET family.

App note: Hot plug insertion startup time delay for eFuse

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App note from ON semiconductors about time delay on start up in conjunction with eFuse to compensate voltage spikes that can falsely trigger them. Link here (PDF)

The eFuse protection devices are used for limiting the system load current in the event of an overload or a short circuit. Many applications employ ON Semiconductor eFuses at the power input stage of the system between the main power input connector and DC−DC converters or power regulators. Such applications often tend to experience a voltage spikes and transients during a hot-plug events, especially when the long cables are used at the power input.

Although ON Semiconductor eFuses are extremely immune to voltage transients and eFuses with the Overvoltage clamp feature provide a fast response when limiting the output voltage during transients, sometimes various applications require a time delay between the hot-plug input voltage application and enabling of the eFuse in order for the input voltage to be stabilized before turning on the eFuse.