Regaining debug access of NXP i.MX RT1064-EVK executing WFI

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Erich Styger writes:

Working with low power modes can be challenging. It can severely affect debugging capabilities of a microprocessor or microcontroller. I ported a FreeRTOS application using the Tickless Idle Mode to the NXP i.MX RT1064 board, and all of a sudden, the board was unresponsive to any debugger connection. Luckily the board was not really bricked, but it took me while to find a way to recover it. So for when you end up in a situation with a ‘bricked’ i.MX RT1064 board, this article might be helpful for you to recover it.

More details on MCU on Eclipse blog.

App note: Blood pressure monitor fundamentals and design

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Application note from NXP on blood pressure monitor fundamentals using their medical oriented MCUs. Link here (PDF)

Arterial pressure is defined as the hydrostatic pressure exerted by the blood over the arteries as a result of the heart left ventricle contraction. Systolic arterial pressure is the higher blood pressure reached by the arteries during systole (ventricular contraction), and diastolic arterial pressure is the lowest blood pressure reached during diastole (ventricular relaxation). In a healthy young adult at rest, systolic arterial pressure is around 110 mmHg and diastolic arterial pressure is around 70 mmHg.

MQTT with lwip and NXP FRDM-K64F Board

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Erich Styger from MCU on Eclipse writes, “In this article I show the basic steps to get MQTT running on the NXP FRDM-K64F board using MCUXpresso IDE, lwip and MQTT. lwip ois a small and open source TCP/IP stack which is widely used. To keep things very simple in this first post, I’m using it in bare-metal (no RTOS) mode with no encryption/security. The principle applies to any IDE/toolchain, as long there is a lwip port available for your board and IDE/toolchain. I’m using the MCUXpresso IDE as it nicely integrates with the MCUXpresso SDK which includes a lwip port for the FRDM-K64F.”

More details at MCU on Eclipse homepage.

App note: Using touch interface in harsh environments

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Tough design and software reference from NXP of touch interface. Link here (PDF)

The touch-sensing method is used to replace most of traditional tact switch inputs as a new type of human-machine interface used in home-appliance applications. However, using such kind of detection method in harsh environment is still a challenge for most of product designers. A good balance of fast response and no false trigger in key detection is always an essential factor for the user-interface design. The touch-sensing input (TSI) module in Freescale MCUs provides capacitive touch detection with high sensitivity and durability, which can help customers to adapt this kind of human touch-sensing technology quicker.

This application note describes how to use the S08PT family MCU features in applications with emphasis on both touch-sensing interface and safety aspect. Different techniques in circuit design, intelligent software control and reliable mechanical structure are illustrated in this application note to show how to achieve a product design with protection features for handling faults and fast TSI response without any false trigger in extreme conditions. Most of the critical scenarios and unexpected use cases from the end-user point of view must be fully studied and well-covered in advance to prevent any serious flaw persisting in the final design stage which causes significant delay in the whole project schedule.

App note: Water level monitoring

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A reference design from NXP about water level detection using pressure sensor. Link here (PDF)

Many washing machines currently in production use a mechanical sensor for water level detection. Mechanical sensors work with discrete trip points enabling water level detection only at those points. The purpose for this reference design is to allow the user to evaluate a pressure sensor for not only water level sensing to replace a mechanical switch, but also for water flow measurement, leak detection, and other solutions for smart appliances. This system continuously monitors water level and water flow using the temperature compensated MPXM2010GS pressure sensor in the low cost MPAK package, a dual op-amp, and the MC68HC908QT4, eight-pin microcontroller.

 

Qualcomm Buys NXP In Largest Ever Semiconductor Deal

Reuters has reported that Qualcomm will purchase NXP for $38 Billion in the largest semiconductor deal ever.

This deal was rumored last month in a deal worth about $30 Billion. Qualcomm’s name should be familiar to all Hackaday readers – they have an immense portfolio of mobile processors, automotive chips, and a ton of connectivity solutions for WiFi, Bluetooth, and every other bit of the EM spectrum. NXP should also be familiar for their hundreds of ARM devices, automotive devices, and Freescale’s entire portfolio.

The deal for $38 Billion is just a bit larger than the previous largest semiconductor deal, Avago’s purchase of Broadcom for $37 Billion.

This latest acquisition has followed acquisitions of ARM Holdings by Japan’s Softbank, On and Fairchild, Avago and Broadcom, NXP and Freescale, Microchip and Atmel, Intel and Altera, and a few dozen we’re forgetting right now. The good news is this immense industry consolidation won’t result in a single gigantic chip maker; there will probably be two or three gigantic chip companies in the future. If I may dredge up an observation from a Mergers and Acquisition post from this summer, this trend didn’t go well for Hughes, Fairchild, Convair, Douglas, McDonnell Douglas, North American, Grumman, Northrop, Northrop Grumman, Bell, Cessna, Schweizer or Sikorsky. It went very well for Lockheed, Boeing, and Textron.


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App note: Embedded orientation detection using the MMA8450Q

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NXP’s accelerometer chip MMA8450Q, provides orientation detection on handheld devices. Link here (PDF)

This application note targets the portrait/landscape orientation detection feature which has become standard in many hand-held electronic devices. Additionally, this application note aims to explain uses as well as highlight some of the challenges of designing an embedded algorithm into the sensor. Included in content, the embedded settings of the MMA8450Q are explained and detailed for implementation.

Qualcomm Looks to Gobble Up NXP

Remember when we talked about NXP merging with Freescale to move into the top ten semiconductor companies? Yeah, that was just eighteen months ago and just barely closed before the new year. Now it looks like Qualcomm wants to acquire NXP to the tune of $30 billion.

You’re most likely familiar with Qualcomm as a cellphone silicon company. The acquisition of NXP opens up a lot of additional markets with their portfolio of chips — automotive among them thanks to the Freescale merger. Now you should be asking yourself just how big Qualcomm is already. What’s perhaps most interesting is that, as mostly a wireless chip company, Qualcomm is ranked number three in worldwide semiconductor sales. Adding NXP — a behemoth now in the top ten — adds at least 30% to Qualcomm’s numbers.

And so here we are, one step close to a monolithic chip fab that produces all computing power for the human race. Yippie!


Filed under: news