The “terrible” 3 cent MCU – a short survey of sub $0.10 microcontrollers

terrible 3 cent MCU

Tim (cpldcpu) writes:

Like many others, I was quite amazed to learn about a microcontroller sold for only 0.03 USD via the EEVblog last year. How was this possible? Many assumed this was a fire sale of an old product. Digging a bit further, it became apparent that there is an entire market segment of ultra-low-cost microcontrollers. Almost all of them are products of rather unknown companies from China or Taiwan. This write up summarizes my findings in this rather peculiar niche.

See the full post on Tim’s blog.

3 cent PMS150C MCU driving 300 WS2812B LED’s

20190422_0010

Driving 300 WS2812B RGB LED’s with “the 3 cent microcontroller” – the Padauk PMS150C.

The 3 cent Padauk PMS150C is.. Interesting to say the least. First of all there’s a lot this little MCU doesn’t do. It doesn’t have a lot of code space (1K Word), it doesn’t have a lot of RAM (64 bytes) and it doesn’t even do hardware multiplication. It doesn’t have an instruction for loading data from ROM either(Though there are ways of getting around this – but that’s a subject for another post). And of course – you can only program it ONCE.

More details at ABNielsen.com.

Check out the video after the break.

Arduino interface for TFA9842AJ power amplifier

tfa9842aj

Dilshan Jayakody writes, “I tested a couple of TFA9842AJ based amplifiers in the last couple of years. The main reason I liked TFA9842AJ is its simple, clean design, wide operating voltage, and high-quality bass-rich audio output.  Thanks to it’s built-in DC volume control circuit this audio amplifier can easily interface with MCU. In this article, we provide a generic TFA9842AJ module which works with most of Arduino boards, MCUs and SOCs.”

See the full post in his blog.

Low cost single cell battery pack simulator

pfig2-600

Mare writes:

There are many battery cell simulators available which could simulate battery cell(s). Unfortunately, none is emulating any of the digital protocols used by fuel gauge devices. Optimal solution to efficiently emulate given smart battery pack is to use custom solution based on battery cell simulator and fuel gauge protocol emulator. Both parts could be fused together in small, but efficient smart battery pack emulator.

  • complete battery cell simulation
  • fast response time
  • unlimited cycle use
  • flexible fuel gauge protocol emulation
  • use of a standard interface for integration in automated test equipment

More details at Mare & Gal Electronics homepage.

Development board for PIC16F1938

PIC16F1938_1-600

Raj over at Embedded Lab has designed a development board for PIC16F1938:

The PIC16F1938 is a versatile 28-pin MCU belonging to Microchip’s extreme low power microcontroller family featuring nanoWatt XLP technology, 28KB of programming memory, 1KB of RAM, 11 ADC channels, and tons of other peripherals. A while ago, I designed a development board for this MCU and I thought it would be worth sharing this design here. The development board features an onboard USB-UART bridge to support the ds30 Loader for easy programming of the PIC MCU. All I/O pins are accessible through 2×5 headers.

Project info at Embedded Lab site.