App note: 3V DACs used in ±10V applications

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Boosting DAC’s output to drive larger voltage tackled in this app note from MAXIM Integrated. Link here (PDF)

Many modern systems have the majority of their electronics powered by 3.3V or lower, but must drive external loads with ±10V, a range that is still very common in industrial applications. There are digital to analog converters (DACs) available that can drive loads with ±10V swings, but there are reasons to use a 3.3V DAC and amplify the output voltage up to ±10V.

App note: Miniature, precision negative reference requires no precision resistors

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App note from Maxim Integrated creating voltage negative reference from charge-pump inverter plus positive voltage reference combo. Link here (PDF)

This application note discusses how to build a negative voltage reference without using external resistors or a negative supply by simply combining a simple charge-pump inverter and a positive output voltage reference.

App note: How to achieve greater accuracy in battery capacity readings for portable designs

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App note from Maxim Integrated on using fuel gauge IC to obtain accurate battery state of charge readings. Link here (PDF)

Because a product’s runtime is limited by battery capacity, it’s critical to have a precise method for measuring the remaining battery capacity to avoid an unexpected shutdown. This application note describes an experiment for obtaining accurate battery capacity readings in a dog-tracking project.

App note: How a SIMO PMIC enhances power efficiency for wearable IoT designs

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App note from MAXIM Integrated on very compact PMIC using only single inductor to drive three independent switching regulators. Link here

Small form factor and minimal power loss are key criteria for internet of things (IoT) hardware, particularly wearables. Meeting these criteria typically involves some tradeoffs. For example, to meet a specific power consumption goal, a designer usually would have to compromise with an increase in design size.

App note: Challenge and Response with 1-Wire® SHA Devices

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Another app note from Maxim Integrated about challenge-response security on 1-wire devices. Link here (PDF)

Challenge-response can be a secure way of protecting access to any privileged material if implemented correctly. In this document, many options for challenge-response access control are discussed but the most secure method given is presenting a different random challenge on each access attempt and having a response that only the host can interpret without giving out any secrets. This document shows why Maxim’s SHA-1 iButtons® and 1-Wire devices are ideal choices when implementing this kind of challenge-response system

App note: Modern thermocouples and a high-resolution DeltaSigma ADC enable high-precision temperature measurement

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Old app note from Maxim Integrated about high-precision temperature measurement. Link here (PDF)

Many industrial and medical applications require temperature measurements with accuracies of ±1°C or better, performed with reasonable cost over a wide range of temperatures (-270°C to +1750°C), and often with low power consumption. Properly selected, standardized, modern thermocouples paired with high-resolution ADC data acquisition systems (DASs) can cover this wide temperature range and ensure reproducible measurements, even in the harshest industrial environments.

App note: Sterilization methods and their impact on medical devices containing electronics

App note from Maxim Integrated on electronic devices sterilization. Link here (PDF)

Although there is considerable literature about sterilization methods and equipment, there is very little written about the impact of sterilization on electronics. This article compares popular sterilization methods and discusses their suitability for objects containing electronics.

App note: Map colors of a CIE plot and color temperature using an RGB color sensor

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An app note from MAXIM integrated on RGB color sensor and their capability to correct color deviation by providing feedback based on a reference color. Link here (PDF)

This application note will show how all the colors within the color gamut formed by red, green, and blue constants in a CIE plot can be measured and mapped with an RGB color sensor. This RGB sensor can also monitor the color output of LEDs in a display and/or provide feedback to maintain a reference color. An RGB sensor will also be mapped to measure the color temperature of practical light sources.