SerialDebug Library for Arduino

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Rui Santos over at Random Nerd Tutorials wrote a series of three posts on how to use the SerialDebug library created by João Lopes with Arduino IDE (programming Arduino, ESP32, ESP8266):

After programming the ESP32 using ESP-IDF, João noticed that debug for Arduino IDE needed some improvement. So, he created the SerialDebug library to bring better debugging to Arduino IDE. He also created a desktop application called SerialDebugApp that adds a UI and other useful functionalities.
To show you all the useful features of the SerialDebug library and the SerialDebugApp, he created three tutorials dedicated to this subject:

Part 1 – Using debug with levels
Part 2 – Simple Software Debugger
Part 3 – SerialDebugApp

See the full post on the Random Nerd Tutorials blog and the library GitHub repository here.

Game audio for the ESP32

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ESP32 game audio at Buildlog.Net blog:

I have been working on some games for the ESP32 and needed some decent quality audio with a minimum number of additional components.  I was bouncing between using the DAC and using the I2S bus. The DAC requires less external parts, so I went that way. I ended up creating a very simple library for use in he Arduino IDE. (Note: This only works with ESP32)

Check out the video after the break.

More Blinky = More Better – The WS2812FX Library

The WS2812 is an amazing piece of technology. 30 years ago, high brightness LEDs didn’t even exist yet. Now, you can score RGB LEDs that even take all the hard work out of controlling and addressing them! But as ever, we can do better.

Riffing on the ever popular Adafruit NeoPixel library, [Harm] created the WS2812FX library. The library has a whole laundry list of effects to run on your blinkenlights – from the exciting Hyper Sparkle to the calming Breathe inspired by Apple devices. The fantastic thing about this library is that it can greatly shorten development time of your garden-variety blinkables – hook up your WS2812s, pick your effect, and you’re done.

[Harm]’s gone and done the hard yards, porting this to a bevy of platforms – testing it on the Arduino Nano, Uno, Micro and ESP8266. As a proof of concept, they’ve also put together a great demonstration of the software – building some cute and stylish Christmas decorations from wood, aluminium, and hacked up Christmas light housings. Combining it with an ESP8266 & an app, the effects can be controlled from a smartphone over WiFi. The assembly video on YouTube shows the build process, using screws and nails to create an attractive frame using aluminium sheet.

This project is a great example of how libraries and modern hardware allow us to stand on the shoulders of giants. It’s quicker than ever to build amazingly capable projects with more LEDs than ever. Over the years we’ve seen plenty great WS2812 projects, like this sunrise alarm clock or this portable rave staff.
As always, blink hard, or go home. Video after the break.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, Holiday Hacks, led hacks

An AVR Atmega library for multiple HD44780 based LCD connected through i2c

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Davide Gironi has posted an I2C multiple HD44780 AVR Atmega library:

This library implements a driver for HD44780 lcd connected through PCF8574 port expander.
Data is transmitted using only 2 wire over i2c with the PCF8574.
This library can drive up to 8 LCD concurrently.
Lcd driver is based upon Peter Fleury’s lcd driver
HD44780 to i2c library its based upon this library

More details at Davide Gironi’s blog.

Check out the video after the break.

ESP8266: SSD1306 OLED library release

Daniel Eichhorn writes:

The “ESP8266 OLED SSD1306″ is an open source library which allows you to control those pretty OLED modules from our beloved ESP8266 module. Fabrice Weinberg cleaned up all the ugly pieces of code which I initially wrote caused by my near C/C++ illiteracy. He also added support for Pasko’s BRZO I2C library which is partially written in assembler and allows a much higher throughput over the I2C channel. Fabrice’s video below compares the the two I2C implementations

More details at Squix TechBlog.