JQ6500, “flashdata error”

After having published my previous posts about the JQ6500 module, some readers wrote me about an error the MusicDownload.exe application shows when they click on the upload button to store the mp3 files in the flash memory.

The error is

flashdata error, have not define program mode in flashdata.ini!!

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It seems that the application is not fully compatible with Windows 8 or 10.

To solve the problem, you only have to enable the Windows 7 compatibility mode:

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With this setting, the upload process runs fine:

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In the following video, you can see all the required steps:

JQ6500 module recovery

In a previous post I presented the JQ6500 audio module. When you connect it to your computer, it’s detected as a CDROM drive.

I brought some modules from different webstores. A couple of them gave me the following error when I tried to browse the content of the CD:

Unable to access the disk. The disk may be damaged.

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It seems that some manufacturers do not program the flash memory of the chip and therefore it doesn’t contain the MusicDownload.exe application.

Luckily, thanks to the work by Reinhard Max and Nikolai Radke, it’s now possible to recover those modules. From Nikolai’s Github repository it’s possible to download an ISO image with a minimal Linux distribution and the recovery toolkit:

jq6500-rec-100

After having downloaded the image, you can burn it to a CD (or use software like UNetbootin to transfer it to a bootable USB drive) and restart your PC with that image.

However, there is an alternative way: the use of VMware Workstation Player, a free virtualization software (for non-commercial use) by VMware. Using this application it’s possible to start a virtual machine on your PC that can run the recovery ISO image.

At the end of this post you can find a video that shows all the following steps…

Let’s see how to do it. After having installed the application, create a new virtual machine:

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Choose I will install the OS later:

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Select Linux as operating system:

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Give the VM a name and select the folder where it will be saved:

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You don’t really need an hard disk, so you can specify a small size for it (for example 1Gb):

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Now you have to configure VMware Player to start the VM using the ISO image. Click on Customize Hardware:

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Select the CD/DVD drive and connect it to the ISO image downloaded from Github:

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Before starting the VM, verify that your module is not connected to the computer:

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Wait for the boot process to complete. The toolkit (started automatically) will warn you that it wasn’t able to identify any modules:

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Open the Removable Devices menu and note down all the listed devices:

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Now connect the module to the USB port. If you open the menu again, you should be able to identify which device corresponds to your module:

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Connect it to the virtual machine:

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Perform a new scan typing the command. If everything is ok, now the toolkit should be able to identify the module:

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Depending on the size of the flash memory of your module, choose the correct menu item. Most modules are sold with a 16Mbit or 2Mbyte memory chip:

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At the end of the recovery process, you can shut down the VM and verify that your computer is now able to display the disk content:

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Video

Here’s a video that shows the recovery process:

First look at JQ6500 modules

For some time, on different chinese webstores (for example Banggood) there is a module called JQ6500 for sale:

jq6500-001 jq6500-002

it’s often described as a voice sound module or as an MP3 player sound module.

Actually JQ6500 is the name of the main chip hosted on the module:

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The chip is manufactured by a Chinese company named JQ. A datasheet for the chip is also available, unfortunately only in Chinese (but Google Translate can help to understand what it contains).

On the other side of the PCB, the module houses two additional integrated circuits:

  • a 16Mbit flash memory (25L1606E)
  • a 3W audio amplifier (HXJ 8002)

When you connect the module to your computer via USB, it is detected as a CDROM drive. If you browse the content of the CD, you can find the MusicDownload.exe application that allows to upload audio files in the flash memory:

jq6500-rec-007

The software is in Chinese but its use is very simple: by moving to the second tab you can select the MP3 files to be uploaded. If you now move back to the initial tab, you can start the upload process clicking on the only available button. In the video at the end of this post you can see how it works…

You can control the JQ6500 chip in different ways. The easiest one is using external buttons connected to pins K1-2-3-4-5:

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When you press a button, the chip plays the corresponding audio file. For example if you press the button connected to pin K1, the chip plays the audio file named 001.mp3.

The onboard amplifier (HXJ 8002) is a mono IC and its output is connected to pin SPK+ and SPK-. You can therefore connect to those pins a small speaker. If you want a stereo audio, you can instead use pins ADL_L (left channel) and ADC_R (right channel) and connect them to an external amplifier.

Conclusions

This module is an excellent and inexpensive solution to add audio to your projects. The use of an internal flash memory has the advantage of not requiring SD cards or other media to store your audio files; in contrast its capacity (16Mbit = 2MByte) makes it more suitable to reproduce sound effects / guide voices than to make a music player.

In the next articles I will show you how to interface the module with Arduino … meanwhile here is a video showing my first tests: