DIY Arduino based RC transmitter

 

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Dejan over at HowToMechatronics posted a detailed how-to on building DIY Arduino RC transmitter:

Now I can wirelessly control any Arduino project with just some small adjustments at the receiver side. This transmitter can be also used as any commercial RC transmitter for controlling RC toys, cars, drones and so on. For that purpose it just needs a simple Arduino receiver which then generates the appropriate signals for controlling those commercial RC devices. I will explain how everything works in this video through few examples of controlling an Arduino robot car, controlling the Arduino Ant Robot from my previous video and controlling a brushless DC motor using an ESC and some servo motors.

More details on HowToMechatronics’ project page.

Check out the video after the break.

PLA dielectric strength measurement

PLA Dielectric Strength Measurement

Kerry Wong did some experiment measuring the dielectric breakdown voltage of PLA:

In my previous post, I designed and 3D printed a high voltage connector for my Bertan 225-20R high voltage power supply. The silicone high voltage wire I ordered had finally arrived so I made a couple of cables using the connectors I printed. A few of my viewers had questioned the suitability of using PLA as printing material in high voltage applications so I decided to measure the dielectric breakdown voltage of PLA and gather some real-world data.

See the full post on his blog here.

Check out the video after the break.

Regaining debug access of NXP i.MX RT1064-EVK executing WFI

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Erich Styger writes:

Working with low power modes can be challenging. It can severely affect debugging capabilities of a microprocessor or microcontroller. I ported a FreeRTOS application using the Tickless Idle Mode to the NXP i.MX RT1064 board, and all of a sudden, the board was unresponsive to any debugger connection. Luckily the board was not really bricked, but it took me while to find a way to recover it. So for when you end up in a situation with a ‘bricked’ i.MX RT1064 board, this article might be helpful for you to recover it.

More details on MCU on Eclipse blog.

The CAN bus

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Jean-Claude has made a series of blog posts on using the Controller Area Network (CAN) bus:

This is the first of what I expect to become a multi-part article series on the CAN bus. I’d like to describe the features of CAN which I find particularly elegant and useful, and will introduce a simple driver I have implemented for it as part of the JeeH library. Along the way, I’ll try to illustrate its use with a variety of small demo apps, running on either a Blue Pill (i.e. F103), or one of the STM32F4 µC families.

Check out Jeelabs’ 6-part blog post here:
Part 1 – Intro
Part 2 – Access
Part 3  – STM32
Part 4 – JeeH API
Part 5 – Demo
Part 6 – Single-wire

Building a direct conversion receiver

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Ryan Flowers over at MiscDotGeek posted a how-to on building a direct conversion receiver:

In the first installment of this series, we discussed why we’re building a Direct Conversion receiver and talked about some basic ideas. In this installment, we explore what it takes to make the leap from a printed schematic to something physical that works. Follow along!

More details at MiscDotGeek.com.

Teensy 3.6 as standalone mediator between USB MIDI and Eurorack

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Sebastian writes:

USB MIDI controllers (such as Launchpad Mini Mk II for example) are common and often quite low in cost.
To interface such a controller with a Eurorack synth system, often a host computer and a MIDI to CV interface might be used. The host computer would take USB MIDI data from the MIDI controller, perhaps store and manipulate that data in some way (e.g. a sequence), using a MIDI to CV converter to then control a Eurorack synth system.
It would be useful to use USB MIDI controllers with Eurorack synth systems without needing a computer and MIDI to CV interface in between the two.
Teensy 3.6 is a great microcontroller that can be programmed using the Arduino IDE. A very useful feature of the Teensy 3.6 is the USB host port.

See the full post on his blog here, Little-Scale.

Check out the video after the break.

Calibrate a magnetic sensor

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Liudr shared a how-to on calibrating a sensor:

First of all, what is calibration? In a general sense, calibrating a sensor makes the sensor provide the most accurate readings allowed by the sensor’s own precision. As an example, let’s assume for a moment that the earth’s magnetic field and any other stray magnetic fields are shielded and you have a uniform magnetic field generated artificially for the sole purpose of calibration. Let’s say that the field strength is 400 mG (milliGauss), equivalent to 40,000 nT (nanoTesla). Now if you align one axis of your magnetic sensor parallel to the direction of the field, it should read 400mG. If you then carefully rotate your sensor so that the axis is anti-parallel with your field, it will read -400mG. If you didn’t do a good job in either alignments, you will read less values, say 390mG, if you’re off by about 13 degrees, because only a portion of the field, which is a vector, is projected along your magnetic sensor’s axis.

See the full post on Liudr’s blog.

Povon home energy monitor part 1, 20 channel system

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Coyt Barringer documented his home energy monitor project called POVON. This first part of a series will detail the 20 Channel sub-metering hardware:

Our initial goal was to monitor power consumption in different parts of the house, and we quickly realized every household circuit would need to be monitored. After some research, small clip on current transformers, or CT’s, looked to be the best sensor for our application. Using CT’s, current draw and thus power on each circuit can be measured. The CT’s would be installed on the wires immediately leaving the circuit breakers in the standard household breaker box. CT’s work great for this because they’re completely isolated and nothing needs to be disconnected to install them.

Project info at lostengineer.com.

Vintage headset conversion

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Quinn Dunki wrote a great article describing the conversion process of a 1980s-era Earmark into a bluetooth headset:

The obvious thing is to convert it to a bluetooth headset for modern use, right? As I previously warned, converting a 1980s-era air traffic control headset into bluetooth headphones is probably the most hipster thing possible. Normally, I don’t allow projects like this around here. But look at these headphones. They are amazing and I love them and I want to use them so I am going to make them bluetooth also shut up. If I have to punch myself as result of now being a hipster tool, so be it. I set out to do this in a non-destructive way that was reversible, at the very least. I wanted to respect the original hardware as much as possible.

Via Blondihacks.