Remote debugging with USB based JTAG/SWD debug probes

ip-based-debugging-with-usb-debug-probe

Erich Styger wrote an article on how to turn a USB debug probe into a IP-based debug solution:

For some projects it is not possible to have the device under debug available on my desk: the board might be in another room, on another site or in a place where physical access is not possible or even dangerous. In that case an IP-based debug probe (see Debugging ARM Cores with IP based Debug Probes and Eclipse) is very useful: as long as I can access its IP address, that works fine. It is an excellent solution even if the board is moving or rotating: hook it up to a WLAN access point and I still can use it as it would be on my desk.

More details on MCU on Eclipse homepage.

ATtiny13 – 8bit mono class D amplifier

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Łukasz Podkalicki shared a how-to on building a Class D amplifier on ATtiny13:

I always wonder whether it is possible to make an amplifier of class D on ATtiny13 or not. Some time ago I found George Gardner’s project based on ATtiny85 – TinyD. It was a sign to start challenging it with ATtiny13. It took me a few hours but finally I made it! The code is very short and useses a lot of hardware settings which has been explained line-by-line in the comments. The project runs on ATtiny13 with maximum internal clock source (9.6MHz). It gave me posibility to use maximum of hardware PWM frequency (Fast PWM mode).

See the full post on his blog.

Check out the video after the break.

Outdoor UV index sensor

Outdoor UV index sensor

A detailed instructions of how to build this outdoor UV index and ambient light sensor from Mare & Gal Electronics:

The VEML6075 senses UVA and UVB light and incorporates photodiode, amplifiers, and analog / digital circuits into a single chip using a CMOS process. When the UV sensor is applied, it is able to detect UVA and UVB intensity to provide a measure of the signal strength as well as allowing for UVI measurement.

Semiconductor radioactivity detector – part 2

IMG_3252-600

Robert Gawron has been working on a radioactivity detector, that is available on GitHub:

There are many ways to measure radioactivity level, semiconductor detectors sense interactions between ionizing radiation and p-n junction. Because in hobbyist area most popular are Geiger-Muller based detectors (in short: not a semiconductor but lamp based devices), I think it’s a cool idea to take a look at this approach.
In this post I will present such home-made sensor and a set of software to parse collected results.

See the full post on his blog. Be sure to see Part 1 here.

Tutorial: Booting the NXP i.MX RT from Micro SD card

sd-card-with-i.mx-rt1052

Erich Styger has written an article on how to boot the NXP i.MX RT from Micro SD card:

It is a common thing to boot a Linux system (see the Raspberry Pi) from a micro SD card. It is not that common for a microcontroller. The NXP i.MX RT ARM Cortex-M7 fills that gap between these two worlds. No surprise that it features a ROM bootloader which can boot from a micro SD card.
Booting from a SD card is kind of cool: load a new software to the card, insert it and boot from it. In some applications this can be very useful: in my configuration the processor starts the ROM bootloader, then loads the image from the SD card into RAM and then runs it. In that configuration no internal or external FLASH memory would be needed.

Via MCU on Eclipse.

Viewing ARM CPU activity in real time

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Jeremy Bentham writes:

In previous blog posts, I have described how an FTDI USB device can be programmed in Python to access the SWD bus of an ARM microprocessor. This allows the internals of the CPU to be accessed, without disrupting the currently running program.
In this blog I take the process one step further, and add a graphical front-end, that shows the CPU activity in real time

More details on Iosoft blog. Source files are available on GitHub.

DIY Arduino based RC transmitter

 

Arduino-RC-Controller-with-14-channels-and-MPU6050-Accelerometer-and-Gyro-600

Dejan over at HowToMechatronics posted a detailed how-to on building DIY Arduino RC transmitter:

Now I can wirelessly control any Arduino project with just some small adjustments at the receiver side. This transmitter can be also used as any commercial RC transmitter for controlling RC toys, cars, drones and so on. For that purpose it just needs a simple Arduino receiver which then generates the appropriate signals for controlling those commercial RC devices. I will explain how everything works in this video through few examples of controlling an Arduino robot car, controlling the Arduino Ant Robot from my previous video and controlling a brushless DC motor using an ESC and some servo motors.

More details on HowToMechatronics’ project page.

Check out the video after the break.

PLA dielectric strength measurement

PLA Dielectric Strength Measurement

Kerry Wong did some experiment measuring the dielectric breakdown voltage of PLA:

In my previous post, I designed and 3D printed a high voltage connector for my Bertan 225-20R high voltage power supply. The silicone high voltage wire I ordered had finally arrived so I made a couple of cables using the connectors I printed. A few of my viewers had questioned the suitability of using PLA as printing material in high voltage applications so I decided to measure the dielectric breakdown voltage of PLA and gather some real-world data.

See the full post on his blog here.

Check out the video after the break.

Regaining debug access of NXP i.MX RT1064-EVK executing WFI

i.MX-RT1064-EVK-Boar

Erich Styger writes:

Working with low power modes can be challenging. It can severely affect debugging capabilities of a microprocessor or microcontroller. I ported a FreeRTOS application using the Tickless Idle Mode to the NXP i.MX RT1064 board, and all of a sudden, the board was unresponsive to any debugger connection. Luckily the board was not really bricked, but it took me while to find a way to recover it. So for when you end up in a situation with a ‘bricked’ i.MX RT1064 board, this article might be helpful for you to recover it.

More details on MCU on Eclipse blog.

The CAN bus

CAN-Bus_wiring

Jean-Claude has made a series of blog posts on using the Controller Area Network (CAN) bus:

This is the first of what I expect to become a multi-part article series on the CAN bus. I’d like to describe the features of CAN which I find particularly elegant and useful, and will introduce a simple driver I have implemented for it as part of the JeeH library. Along the way, I’ll try to illustrate its use with a variety of small demo apps, running on either a Blue Pill (i.e. F103), or one of the STM32F4 µC families.

Check out Jeelabs’ 6-part blog post here:
Part 1 – Intro
Part 2 – Access
Part 3  – STM32
Part 4 – JeeH API
Part 5 – Demo
Part 6 – Single-wire