So how to do CW on a homebrew SSB rig?

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Pete Juliano, N6QW, has written an article on how to do CW on a homebrew SSB rig:

The Answer is Not a Flippant: Carefully!
Author’s note: A friend in VK4 land made an inquiry about CW operation. I find that 99.99% of my operating time is SSB. But others spend a greater time on the air using CW so why not share some info and data that I have stashed on my computer where a SSB rig can be made to work CW. This also open the possibility of filter switching for a more narrow pass band. With Arduino anything may be possible.

More details on Pete Juliano’s (N6QW) blog.

Homebrew SDR HF transceiver

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Simonhk (G0FCU) wrote a series of posts on building homebrew SDR HF transceiver:

However, what you might notice is the presence of image products in the waterfall. The processing of the signal suppresses all but the very strongest of these so they don’t appear as audio but it is mighty confusing when they are on the waterfall but actually not there (if you see what I mean)!
I am in the process of building a QSD or Tayloe Detector, which should provide better rejection of images. I have breadboarded one of these, it works but not very well. I think that this might be due to the length of leads I have on the breadboard so I am trying to use Eagle CAD to design a circuit board to overcome these problems.

Check out the video after the break.

 

Simple homebrew 6502 computer

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Sven Krasser blogged about his 6502-based homebrew 8-bit computer build:

After completing my VGA Generator project a while back, I’ve embarked on a new electronics project: building a simple 6502-based homebrew 8-bit computer on a breadboard. There are a bunch of similar projects online from which to draw ideas. Some projects set constraints such as only using contemporary parts of the 8-bit era, no FPGAs, no microcontrollers etc. In my case, I opted instead to keep the constraints minimal and the project simple.

See the full post on his blog here.

Check out the video after the break.

N6QW Heathkit SSB transceiver

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Pete Juliano, N6QW,  has a nice build log on his newest version Heathkit 40M SSB Transceiver:

What are you thinking — I am not trying to break any world record? My XYL asked me that question today — why are you building another rig? Followed up by a snide comment that I had so many rigs now why do I need another one. Well the answer plain and simple because I can!
For the longest time in the late 60’s early 70’s my success rate with homebrew SSB transceivers was miserable. At that time I lacked the more sophisticated test gear and let’s face it some of the technology wasn’t that great. Crappy Analog VFO’s were high on the list of impediments! I also had to work and to give a fair share of my time to the family — it is that balance thing.
But today that is all changed –better test gear, better technology like Digital VFO’s and a bit more time. The latest project is to demonstrate that some of the components out of boat anchors can indeed be reworked to provide a very modern, very capable rig.

See the full post on N6QW blog.

Check out the video after the break.

Homebrew PiHPSDR

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g4fre built his own PIHPSDR, that is available at github:

Having seen the Apache-labs version of the PIHPSDR I wanted to customise it to fill my needs, so I needed to build my own
All the needed information , with the software, is at John Melton’s github site github.com/g0orx/pihpsdr The hardware shopping list includes. RaspberryPi 3, 7″ Official Raspberry Pi LCD, 8 push buttons, 4 rotary encoders, case and power supply.
All the items were mounted in a 12x7x2″ aluminium case obtained from Mouser, The display was held in place with plastic channel finishing strips from B&Q.

More details at g4fre radio blog.

Homebrew dummy load

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A simple DIY dummy load project from Flathagen:

I have created a simple 50 Ω dummy load to test transmitters. I also added a simple RF diode detector so I can measure the peak voltage, and calculate the power.
The dummy load consists of eight 100 Ω resistors rated at 2 W so the load should handle 16 W, at least for short periods. I constructed the dummy load using a combination of ugly construction and Manhattan style, by gluing pieces of PCB (as isolation pads) on top of a ground plane PCB. Then I soldered the components directly on the copper without drilling holes.

Project info at DIYcrap.

Georges F6DFZ’s very stylish homebrew version of the Scout Regen receiver

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Dave Richards AA7EE has published an article about Georges F6DFZ’s homebrew regen receiver:

Several months ago, Georges F6DFZ sent me pictures of a Manhattan project he had just completed, using Rex’s MeSQUARES, and I have waited far too long to share it with you. It began life as a copy of the Ten Tec 1253 regen, but George said that the results and usability were very poor. One thing that must be said about regens is that the ones which don’t work well are very dispiriting. However, when you come across a good design and build it well, the performance can be very satisfying indeed. Luckily, Georges didn’t let his initial regen experience put him off, and he ended up turning the project into a receiver based on the Kitchin-inspired Scout Regen. He normally uses PCB software to design custom boards for his projects, but decided to try Manhattan construction for this receiver.
I like how his project was obviously the result of considerable careful planning

More details at Dave Richards AA7EE blog.

DIY Powerpole voltage and current meters

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Sverre Holm made his own powerpole voltage and current meters:

Powerpole voltage and current monitoring is quite nice to have. One can buy commercial meters, but due to the availability of nice and cheap modules, it is very easy to make them oneself.
To the right you’ll see my combined voltage and current meter as well as my volt-meter on top of the power supply.

More info at LA3ZA Radio & Electronics.