The Boris Beacon – A 1mW solar powered hifer beacon

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Dave Richards (AA7EE) has written an article detailing his 1mW solar-powered HiFER beacon project, the Boris Beacon:

In this post from May of last year, I detailed the construction of a 1mW solar-powered HiFER beacon. I named it the Boris Beacon, in tribute to my neighbor’s cat. The beacon was never mounted permanently outside. I kept it indoors, powered from a small solar panel in the window, and feeding an “antenna” of sorts, consisting of the original dipole wires folded up into two small bundles. Obviously, I had no serious intention of it being heard by anyone; I just liked having it come on every day when the sun came up, and transmitting until later in the day, when the light was too low to sustain operation.

See the full post on his blog.

WBR-Oscar regen receiver

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A nice write-up on Sheldon’s (N6JJA) version of N1BYT’s WBR regenerative receiver:

This article is broken into two parts. First comes the “Oscar” preselector/preamplifier. As I said, I intended it to be either part of the overall receiver or used as a standalone where desired. The second part deals with the WBR upgrades. Both designs were built using the same techniques and I’ve tested both and found that—especially in concert—they do about as well as some of my boat anchors! So if your soldering iron is ready, I’ll start by describing “Oscar.”

Via Dave Richards AA7EE Blog.

Radionova 1 frequency synthesizer

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Vasily Ivanenko has written up documentation on his Radionova 1 frequency synthesizer project:

Frequency synthesizer for my Jupiter receiver — Радионова 1 — [ Radionova 1 ]
Greetings! Most of my future homebrew radio projects will focus on building radio astronomy gear.
Radio astronomy offers much fun + learning for the radio homebuilder — example topics include how to design and make antennas, LNAs, receivers, and frequency synthesizers from HF to microwave. Further we may craft op-amp analog integrators to remove background noise, and/or ADCs, plus write software to store and analyze our data. Avid radio astronomers enjoy a strong understanding of noise measurement/physics, plus a whole lot of really cool science. I’ve already made new friends and feel inspired by the dedicated, skillful folks who listen to signals from space on stuff they craft in their home labs. In radio astronomy, Dx might mean receiving signals from 590 million kilometers away. I’m in!

Project info at QRP HomeBuilder blog.