6×1 antenna switch

pmini-14_Preklopnik1x6-600

Mare published a new build:

This is complete project for 1×6 antenna switch. It was bult in more than 50 pieces around the world and performs really good. Even big guns use it for their systems. The project was designed with help from other OMs (S55O, S59MA, S50LD, S51CT, S51ZJ, SM2WMV/SJ2W and others).

More details at Mare & Gal Electronics.

My Beef with Ham Radio

My amateur radio journey began back in the mid-1970s. I was about 12 at the time, with an interest in electronics that baffled my parents. With little to guide me and fear for my life as I routinely explored the innards of the TVs and radios in the house, they turned to the kindly older gentleman across the street from us, Mr. Brown. He had the traditional calling card of the suburban ham — a gigantic beam antenna on a 60′ mast in the backyard – so they figured he could act as a mentor to me.

Mr. Brown taught me a lot about electronics, and very nearly got me far enough along to take the test for my Novice class license. But I lost interest, probably because I was an adolescent male and didn’t figure a ham ticket would improve my chances with the young ladies. My ham ambitions remained well below the surface as life happened over the next 40 or so years. But as my circumstances changed, the idea of working the airwaves resurfaced, and in 2015 I finally took the plunge and earned my General class license.

The next part of my ham story is all-too-familiar these days: I haven’t done a damn thing with my license. Oh, sure, I bought a couple of Baofeng and Wouxun handy-talkies and lurked on the local repeaters. I even bought a good, solid HF rig and built some antennas, but I’ve made a grand total of one QSO — a brief chat with a ham in Texas from my old home in Connecticut on the 10-meter band. That’s it.

Obviously, there’s a problem. It’s not lack of understanding the art and science of amateur radio. More so than the average Joe who comes in off the street to sit for a license test (and there are far more of those folks than you might think), I have a pretty good grasp of the theory and practice of RF communications. It’s not a money problem, either. At least for now I have enough disposable income to spend on “The World’s Greatest Hobby.” It’s not time either, at least not really. My kids are old enough now to be self-reliant, so it’s not like I’d be working the bands while there are dirty diapers to deal with. And my wife is supportive too, so it’s not that either. So what’s my problem? Why am I not active on the HF bands and checking in on the local repeaters?

Because as it turns out, when you’re a ham you end up talking to other hams. And I don’t like talking to hams.

Lest this be construed as ham-hate, it’s not. Truth be told, I don’t really want to talk to anyone, face to face or over the air. But there’s really something off-putting about the ham style of communication, at least to my ears. Part of this is due to listening to public service radio all my life. My dad was a cop, and hearing dispatches on the radio in his cruiser was the soundtrack of my life from the day I was born. I later listened to scanners as a civilian hobbyist, then with a more professional interest as an EMT and volunteer firefighter. I even worked the other side of the mic as a dispatcher for multiple agencies. So I developed a strong preference in radio style — brief, clipped messages that minimize time on the air while maximizing information content.

In other words, the exact opposite of what hams do.

When I hear two hams chewing the rag, I find myself thinking, “Please, just stop talking and take your thumb off the mic switch.” It’s not so much what they’re talking about, although that certainly plays into it; lots of recounting what the “XYL” made for dinner and updates on everyone’s prostate woes. I could overlook the content choice if someone, somewhere would just unkey the mic once in while and take a breath.

I know, I know — that’s not what ham radio is for. The ham bands are for conversation more than anything else, at least from the sound of it. I think I might have a better experience if I explore the HF nets that meet regularly in preparation for providing emergency communications in disasters; they might be more my style. Or perhaps the digital modes would suit me better – being able to type brief, content-rich messages and make contacts without any of that pesky talking sounds pretty keen to me.

But as it stands, I’m pretty sure I won’t be hanging around the local 2-meter repeater to make sure everyone knows what I’m getting at the grocery store. I’m glad the local hams have built out the infrastructure to do so, and I’m heartened to know they’re practicing the craft. I just don’t want to talk to them that much.

So, active hams, what part of the craft to you find engaging? I’d love to hear your suggestions for ways I, or anyone else, can make greater use of the license and help keep the hobby fun for new and old hams alike.


Filed under: Hackaday Columns, radio hacks, rants

Mini CW Keyer / QRSS beacon v1.1

keyer-600

Marko Pavlin has designed a PCB for the CW keyer, he writes:

I designed dedicated PCB for the CW keyer. The project is very similar to the version made on prototyping board.

Here are the updates:
– I added relay and optocoupler for PTT control
– The “CW melody” selection pins have three jumpers for 8 combinations
– The audio output has 1W audio amplifier and RC at the PWM output (work to do in software driver for audio generator)
– USB connector is microUSB female which can be used with any phone charger

Project info at Mare & Gal Electronics site.

Programmable CW Morse Keyer / beacon

beacon

Marko Pavlin has designed a Mini USB dongle with STM32F0xx , he writes:

Mini USB dongle with STM32F0xx is suitable many for simple, mini projects. I attached speaker to Timer14 PWM output (Pin PA6) and LED (or optocoupler connected to PTT) to GPIO pin PA0
The provided software is based on USB Virtual Com Port (VCP) device. The setup is done with command line interface using terminal from any PC. The setup is stored in the internal flash and PC is not required for normal operation. The mini beacon keyer can be used when powered with 5V.

Project info at Mare & Gal Electronics.

Simple small QRO for HF

IMG_8931-600

Marko Pavlin has been working on a HF amplifier project:

I followed the ARRL Homberw challenge 50 watt aplifier entry. It is low cost, simple HF linear amplifier designed and built by the author as an entry in the ARRL’s 2009 Homebrew Challenge contest. The requirements of the amplifier were: 40 meter band 50 watt output amplifier intended for use with a QRP transmitter as driver (less than 5W), constructed at a total material cost of not over $125.00.
I redesigned author original design an put it on the double sided PCB with additional output banpass filters. I started with first prototype. It worked quite well for short periods. Main disadvantage was lack of heat sink. Then I soldered second prototype with proper transistor cooling. I also wound correct transformer using binocular ferrite cores
Next step was designing PCB. I started with the schematic diagram based on original project

Project info at Mare & Gal Electronics homepage.