AtPack: Atmel Pack parser, visualizer and fuse calculator

AtPack

 

AtPack – Atmel Pack parser, visualizer and fuse calculator from Vagrearg:

Looking for an up-to-date fuse-calculator for the Atmel(*) AVR chips has been something of a long search. There are several online versions, but they have not been updated to the new chips (like the ATmega328PB).
When you have got an itch, you simply scratch it… Don’t you?
Well, I did, and it resulted in an analysis of the Atmel Pack format, which can be freely downloaded under an Apache 2.0 license. The AtPacks contain a master XML file with device lists and links to each device’s XML file, which in turn describes the entire chip. The format is not that hard to understand and can be easily mangled into something useful. Then, some crude jQuery hacking and many hours later… you know how that works.

Code is at GitHub and there is an online version.

Via Vagrearg.

Converting a Seeburg 3WA wallbox into a remote for a modern music player

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Dr. Scott M. Baker wrote an article detailing how he converted a Seeburg 3WA wallbox into a media player for his homebuilt audio player:

A bit of background. These Wallboxes were used as remotes in diners and other locations back in the 1950s. You put your nickel, dime, or quarter into the Wallbox, which racks up some credits. Then you select the song you want and the Wallbox sends a signal to the Jukebox, which adds your selection to the queue. Soon thereafter your music is playing through the diner. I’m too young to have experienced these in person when they were state of the art, but I do have an appreciation for antique and retro projects.
A new fad is to convert these wallboxes into remotes for your home audio system, be it Sonos or something else. I have my own homebuilt audio system, basically an augmented Pandora player, so my goal was to use the wallbox to control that.

See the full post on his blog here.

Check out the video after the break.

Philips Hue – control anything hack

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Fred writes:

To be honest, my recent simple relay hack wasn’t really all that great. It just used the high power constant current output to drive a SSR. It wasn’t ideal, but it worked. I decided that it was worth the effort to track down some more useful outputs and properly detect the desired state of the bulb.
All it took was a little bit of poking around and probing the pins of the SAM R21 microcontroller with an oscilloscope. It wasn’t actually that hard. On the B22 bayonet fitting version of the bulb I found some.

More details on his blog here, 0xFRED.

PS2-TTLserial adapter for RC2014 and MIDI

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Dr. Scott M. Baker published a new build:

The original reason for this project is that I wanted to build a standalone RC2014 with keyboard and display. There is an official RC2014 serial keyboard, but I find it a little inconvenient for my big fingers and poor eyesight. I have plenty of old PS/2 keyboards laying around, so I figured I’d rig up a microcontroller to convert the PS/2 keyboard interface into a TTL-level serial interface that could be plugged directly into the RC2014’s serial port.
Along the way, I discovered that the very same circuit would make an interesting project to turn a PS/2 keyboard into a simple MIDI controller. So I adapted the circuit for that purpose as well.

See the full post on his blog.

Check out the video after the break.

Vintage MIDI: Roland MT-32, Roland SC-55, HardMPU, and an Xi 8088

Dr. Scott Baker writes:

In this video, I decided to upgrade my home built PC from AdLib sound to MIDI. I tried out a couple different midi modules, the Roland MT-32 and the Roland SC-55. I learned that I’d need an MPU-401 or compatible ISA interface, and I explored the alternatives, eventually settling on the HardMPU by Ab0tj. Using the HardMPU schematic, I built a board, programmed the microcontroller, and tried out Vintage games on my Xi 8088. I also wrote my own Midi player to play .MID files using MPU-401 intelligent mode.

See the full post on his blog.

Modifying a computer ATX power supply for higher output voltage

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Kerry Wong wrote a post on his blog showing how he modified the 12V rail of a TL494 based ATX power supply to 14.6V for 4S LiFePO4 battery charging:

To charge the 110Ah battery bank I built, I need a power supply that can provide at least 10A at 14.6V. Since I have many old ATX power supplies lying around and the 12V rails of these power supplies are more than capable of providing 10A, I decided to modify one such power supply for using as a 4S LiFePO4 battery charger.

More details at his blog here.

Check out the video after the break.

TS100 oscilloscope hack

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Befinitiv wrote an article describing his modification to turn a TS100 soldering iron into an oscilloscope:

As you can see in the video, you can use the soldering tip as your measurement probe. Coincidentally, a soldering iron has already a pretty good form factor for an oscilloscope. Here is a still picture of a UART waveform

See the full post on his blog.

Check out the video after the break.

Halogen floodlight SMT reflow

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David Sanz Kirbis built his own reflow device with an halogen floodlight, that is available on Github:

First test was to check the speed of the temperature rise inside a standard halogen floodlight. Reflow soldering temperature curves are quite demanding, and some adapted ovens can’t reach the degrees-per-second speed of the ramp-up stages of these curves.
I bought the spotlight, put an aluminium sheet covering the inside surface of the protective glass (to reduce heat loss), and measured the temperature rise with a multimeter’s thermometer…. and wow! More than 5ºC/s… and I better turned the thing off after reaching 300ºC and still rising quickly.
So the floodlight was able to fulfill the needs.
Next step was a temperature controller, that is, the device that keeps the temperature as in a specified reflow curve profile in each moment.

See the full post and more details on his blog, TheRandomLab.

Check out the video after the break.