Build an ESP8266 web server – Code and schematics (NodeMCU)

esp8266-web-server-thumbnail-600

A detailed instructions of how to build an ESP8266 Web Server using NodeMCU firmware:

This tutorial is a step-by-step guide that shows how to build a standalone ESP8266 Web Server that controls two outputs (two LEDs). This ESP8266 NodeMCU Web Server is mobile responsive and it can be accessed with any device with a browser in your local network.

Via Random Nerd Tutorials.

Check out the video after the break.

Temperature/weather station

9 Running-600

B. Perry writes:

I’ve always been fond of the popular Nixie clocks made from old surplus Soviet nixie tubes. Nixie tubes are no longer made, so they’re hard to acquire. Instead, I took inspiration from “Lixie” displays and made my own Nixie-inspired, LED-powered display. And in an unusual twist (for me, anyway), I didn’t make a clock this time! It’s a weather/temperature display.  I made the parts myself, starting with the electronics. These circuit boards were created on the CNC machine. The “brains” are an ESP8266 chip, which grabs the current weather from the Internet.

See the full post in his blog.

‘No-Parts’ temperature measurement with Arduino Pro Mini

1 sec WDT interval timed with micros() vs si7051 reference temperature, to determine temperature variation of the RC based timer vs the crystal based timer, as a function of temperature

From the comments on our ESP8266 temperature logger post, Edward Mallon  writes:

The ESP8266 has a hardware watchdog timer, so you could probably use that to measure temperature to much better resolution that you’d get from a DS18B20. We get better than 0.003C using the technique with cheap Pro Mini Clones
Ooops, I missed an important aspect of the two clock method – the inter-reading jitter in the micros() reads brings the resolution down to DS18b20 levels.

More details on Underwater Arduino Data Loggers blog.

WiFiChron alarm clock

8x16-600

Here’s a cool WiFiChron clock with 8-character alphanumeric LED display by Florinc:

For WiFiChron, two cascaded modules make an 8-character display functionally similar to HDSP-2534, but bigger and more visible. With the “Display Abstraction Layer” already in place, software support should be easy to integrate, since controlling it with the HT16K33 breakout allows the re-use of the above mentioned Adafruit LED backpack library. For maximum compatibility, I followed the same wiring, then connected the two extra segments, A2 and D2, to pin 10 (not connected for the 14-segment backpack) and pin 11 (connected to the DP), respectively.

More details on Wise time with Arduino blog.

MusiCubes project

MusicCube

Michael Teeuw published a new build:

Now that the MusiCubes tray is assembled and the RFID-sensor and LEDs are working as expected, It’s time to add the last feature of the original concept: invisible capacitive touch sensors to control the volume of the music.

See the full post on Xonay Labs blog. Be sure to see Part 1 and 2.

Check out the video after the break.

trigBoard – Ultra low power ESP8266 IoT platform

trigboard

Kevin Darrah writes:

The trigBoard is an IoT project that does one thing – it pushes you a notification triggered by a digital input. Well, it’s much more than that, but this is the inspiration. I wanted to design a WiFi board that essentially sleeps most of its life, but when that door switch, flood sensor, motion sensor, etc.. gets triggered, I just want a notification immediately on my phone. And that’s about it… a perfect IoT device in the background doing its job.

Project info on Kevin Darrah Wiki. It’s also up on Tindie.

Check out the video after the break.

Build a Multisensor Shield for ESP8266

Build-ESP8266-WeMos-D1-Mini-Multisensor-Shield

Rui Santos has a great write-up on building a Multisensor Shield for ESP8266, that is available on GitHub:

In this project you’ll discover how to design and create a Multisensor Shield for the ESP8266 Wemos D1 Mini board. The shield has temperature sensor (DS18B20), a PIR motion sensor, an LDR, and a terminal to connect a relay module. We’ll start by preparing all the hardware and then program it.

See the full post on Random Nerd Tutorials blog.

EEPROM rotation for ESP8266 and ESP32

naked-esp12-624x416

Xose Pérez over at Tinkerman writes:

The Arduino Core for ESP8266 and ESP32 uses one SPI flash memory sector to emulate an EEPROM. When you initialize the EEPROM object (calling begin) it reads the contents of the sector into a memory buffer. Reading a writing is done over that in-memory buffer. Whenever you call commit it write the contents back to the flash sector.
Due to the nature of this flash memory (NOR) a full sector erase must be done prior to write any new data. If a power failure (intended or not) happens during this process the sector data is lost.
Also, writing data to a NOR memory can be done byte by byte but only to change a 1 to a 0. The only way to turn 0s to 1s is to perform a sector erase which turns all memory positions in that sector to 1. But sector erasing must be done in full sectors, thus wearing out the flash memory faster.

How can we overcome these problems?

Full details at tinkerman.cat.

ESP8266 SPI Spy

pzem021_front-600

nop head writes:

I came across a very useful post by Thomas Scherrer that describes how to read data from a Peacefair PZEM-021 energy meter by spying on the SPI bus with an Arduino. I decided to do the same thing with an ESP-12F WiFi module so that I could view the results remotely and plot graphs, etc. It took me a lot longer to get this working than I anticipated due to a few problems along the way.
The main hardware difference is the ESP8266 is a 3.3V device but the Arduino is 5V. The PZEM-021 is actually a mixture. The RN8208G metering chip is a 5V device. It is a SPI slave, the SPI master is an STM32 ARM processor that is 3.3V but with 5V tolerant inputs.

More details at HydraRaptor blog.