BUS PIRATE: first test of Ultra v1b with SPI EEPROM

Bus Pirate prototype “Ultra” v1b successfully wrote to and read back from a 25LC020A SPI EEPROM chip. The image shows the Bus Pirate reading 8 bytes of 0x02 from the EEPROM at address 0x00, and the bus activity can be verified on the logic analyzer graph. Still a long way to go, but it’s nice to have everything working.

Tomorrow we’ll finish the major SPI commands and general purpose mode features like analog measurement and manipulation of the auxiliary pins. As always, you can follow our latest progress in the forum.

EEPROM rotation for ESP8266 and ESP32

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Xose Pérez over at Tinkerman writes:

The Arduino Core for ESP8266 and ESP32 uses one SPI flash memory sector to emulate an EEPROM. When you initialize the EEPROM object (calling begin) it reads the contents of the sector into a memory buffer. Reading a writing is done over that in-memory buffer. Whenever you call commit it write the contents back to the flash sector.
Due to the nature of this flash memory (NOR) a full sector erase must be done prior to write any new data. If a power failure (intended or not) happens during this process the sector data is lost.
Also, writing data to a NOR memory can be done byte by byte but only to change a 1 to a 0. The only way to turn 0s to 1s is to perform a sector erase which turns all memory positions in that sector to 1. But sector erasing must be done in full sectors, thus wearing out the flash memory faster.

How can we overcome these problems?

Full details at tinkerman.cat.

App note: Adding flexibility by using multiple footprints for I2C™ serial EEPROMs

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Save PCB space by utilizing EEPROM SOIC-8 area, here’s an application note from Microchip. Link here (PDF)

For many years, the 8-lead SOIC package has been the most popular package for serial EEPROMs, but now smaller packages are becoming more commonplace. This offers a number of benefits; the reductions in footprint size and component height are some of the more obvious ones. Smaller packages also generally offer a cost advantage over their larger counterparts.

Dual-boot Your Arduino

There was a time, not so long ago, when all the cool kids were dual-booting their computers: one side running Linux for hacking and another running Windows for gaming. We know, we were there. But why the heck would you ever want to dual-boot an Arduino? We’re still scratching our heads about the application, but we know a cool hack when we see one; [Vinod] soldered the tiny surface-mount EEPROM on top of the already small AVR chip! (Check the video below.)

aAside from tiny-soldering skills, [Vinod] wrote his own custom bootloader for the AVR-based Arduino. With just enough memory to back up the AVR’s flash, the bootloader can shuffle the existing program out to the EEPROM while flashing the new program in. For more details, read the source.

While you might think that writing a bootloader is deep juju (it can be), [Vinod]’s simple bootloader application is written in C, using a style that should be familiar to anyone who has done work with an Arduino. It could certainly be optimized for size, but probably not for readability (and tweakability).

Why would you ever want to dual boot an Arduino? Maybe to be able to run testing and stable code on the same device? You could do the same thing over WiFi with an ESP8266. But maybe you don’t have WiFi available? Whatever, we like the hack and ‘because you can’ is a good enough excuse for us. If you do have a use in mind, post up in the comments!


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, Microcontrollers