Quantifying cooling

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Chris Palmer (a.k.a nophead) has designed and built this coolometer project to quantify the cooling effectiveness of various fan:

I was wondering about how I was going to calibrate the airflow reading but then realised that the flow rate is not actually what I am interested in. It is the cooling effect the airflow has, which is what I am directly measuring. The result is simply the extra power needed to maintain a target temperature and is a measure how fast the bulb filament is being cooled. So rather than an anemometer I decided to call it a coolometer. Unfortunately Futurama used that name first. Rather than displaying megafonzies mine displays milliwatts!

Project info at HydraRaptor blog.

Programmable CW Morse Keyer / beacon

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Marko Pavlin has designed a Mini USB dongle with STM32F0xx , he writes:

Mini USB dongle with STM32F0xx is suitable many for simple, mini projects. I attached speaker to Timer14 PWM output (Pin PA6) and LED (or optocoupler connected to PTT) to GPIO pin PA0
The provided software is based on USB Virtual Com Port (VCP) device. The setup is done with command line interface using terminal from any PC. The setup is stored in the internal flash and PC is not required for normal operation. The mini beacon keyer can be used when powered with 5V.

Project info at Mare & Gal Electronics.

Nixie thermometer

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Luca Dentella has developed a Nixie thermometer to measure the temperature of the liquid cooling system, that is available on Github.

 I decided to log the design and the development of the project in ten blog posts. They show my “divide et impera” approach: I divided the whole project in small tasks (drive a nixie with Arduino, read the temperature from a thermistor, use an rgb led module, prepare the first prototype on a perfboard, design the pcb, assembly the final product), all described on my blog with examples and videos.

Project info at Lucadentella.it

Check out the video after the break.

Nixie thermometer

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Luca Dentella has developed a Nixie thermometer to measure the temperature of the liquid cooling system, that is available on Github.

 I decided to log the design and the development of the project in ten blog posts. They show my “divide et impera” approach: I divided the whole project in small tasks (drive a nixie with Arduino, read the temperature from a thermistor, use an rgb led module, prepare the first prototype on a perfboard, design the pcb, assembly the final product), all described on my blog with examples and videos.

Project info at Lucadentella.it

Check out the video after the break.

Happy Valentines day!

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Sjaak built this blinky heart for his girlfriend this Valentines day. It is based on a MAX7219 and a PIC16f1823:

My girlfriend persuaded me to start this hobby side project and as a favor I made her this blinky heart. I don’t want to buy a standard trumpery from the shop, so I locked myself up into my mancave and started to solder and code as a monkey. I put a MAX7219 8×8 LED matrix, a PIC16f1823, a CR2032 coin cell with holder and a vibration switch together. Most of the stuff I had already lying around so I started immediately.
Somewhere on the web I found a small tutorial how to use the MAX7219 with the buspirate. That made it really simple for me to test the display for faults and get myself familiar with the command set.

Project info at SMDprutser blog.

‘Magic tree’ project

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Dilshan Jayakody has published a new build, a ‘Musical trees’:

“Musical trees” is a part of creative arts installation and this project is capable to produce different audio tones by detecting human touch to its attached plants. Existing version of this driver is capable to monitor 8 plants and produce different sounds for each plant.
This project is build around PIC16F628A 8-bit microcontroller and PT2399 echo processor IC. To drive the sensor electrodes we use pair of CD4011 quad 2-input NAND gate ICs. This prototype use TDA7052 1W audio amplifier IC to drive the speaker(s).

More details at Jayakody’s blog.

Check out the video after the break.


mavroOBD, an open source Arduino compatible OBD/Can-Bus module

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Mavromatics’ open source project designed to “hack” your vehicle, that is available on github:

The goal of this project it to create an Arduino based OBD port module that can be used to enhance a vehicles capabilites. For example, if you want door locks to close when moving faster than 5mph or to invoke/emulate certain CANbus buttons automatically at start up.

Project info at Mavromatis’ blog.

flip-flop/BCF project

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Ray over at the diyAudio forum has been working on his flip-flop/BCF project:

I’ve just finished a project to roll up the developments into a more ‘finished’ build, feeding the balanced outputs from the flip-flop board into a Broskie BCF buffer stage. I’m using Nicks MJ Statistical Regulator for the B+ and one of Andrew’s indirect filament supplies

Project info at diyAudio forum.

Building a low cost wifi camera

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Johan Kanflo designed a Esparducam board and built a low cost wifi camera with an Arducam Mini and a ESP8266 Wifi module:

Sometime ago I came across the Arducam Mini which is quite a nice camera module from UCTronics. It is a small PCB with a two megapixel OmniVision OV2640 sensor, an interchangeable lens and an FPGA to do the heavy lifting of image processing and JPEG encoding. Priced at around 24 Euros (lens included) you can easily buy a few without hurting your wallet and combined with an ESP8266 you can build quite a low cost wifi camera. Or several. Because designing and building PCBs is both fun and inexpensive I designed a board to go with the ESP8266/Arducam Mini combo, aptly named the Esparducam. And uniquely named too, try googeling for “esparducam“. Heck, even the domain name is available at the time of writing :)

More details at Johan Kanflo’s blog.

Project files are available on Github.