Fuzz Factory replica

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Adam Zeloof made his own guitar pedal based on the Zvex Fuzz Factory:

The Z.VEX Fuzz Factory is an amazing little fuzz pedal designed by musical and electrical wizard Zachary Vex. I was introduced to it through Matt Bellamy‘s unique guitar style, and fell in love with its out-of-this-world sound. While I was tempted to buy a Z.VEX original for their beautiful hand-painted cases, I decided to save a few bucks and make my own.

See the full post on his blog.

Simple digital clock with PIC16F628A and DS1307 and 7-segment LED display

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A simple digital clock with PIC16F628A + DS1307:

In this new project I am again using PIC16F628A microcontroller. The goal is simple digital clock with 7-segment LED display and the clock will have no additional functionality – no alarm, no seconds digits, no date. The latter can be added in the software though. For the RTC chip I chose DS1307. For the LED display I used Kingbright CC56-21SRWA.

More details on DIYfan blog.

Check out the video after the break.

Phase-locked inverter

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Here’s a great write-up on building a phase-locked inverter from mitxela.com:

 The input is at 50Hz and the output is at 60Hz. So for every 5 input cycles, we want to generate 6 output cycles. We will be synthesizing a sine wave in software, and there’s no reason not to go with a conventional lookup table of 256 bytes. The PWM will be averaged out by the coils in the motor. It may even be possible to drive it with a square wave, but there is a self-starting mechanism I don’t want to interfere with. A synchronous single-phase motor normally will spin in either direction, and if you want it to spin only one way (as is the case with a clock) extra components are needed. It could be a mechanical pawl that stops it starting in the wrong direction, but the rotor spins very freely in either direction when the clock is powered off. More likely, there is a capacitor and/or additional coils which provide the shove in the right direction.

Project info at mitxela.com.

PortL2 – Portable electric vehicle charger

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Here’s a project log covering the build of a portable level 2 electric vehicle charger by Andrew Rossignol:

This is a battery-powered EV charger that allows destination charging where L2 charging is not ordinarily available. This can be used as a range extender for electric vehicles with smaller batteries. This system has a ~7kWh battery which should charge my Cadillac ELR to more than 60%. This has been a fun project with plenty of lessons learned.

More info at The Resistor Network.

Check out the video after the break.

1750Hz tone generator

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Dilshan Jayakody published a new build:

The 1750Hz tone bursts are often used to trigger repeaters. There are several methods to build 1750Hz tone generators which including TC5082 divider, using MCUs, etc.
In this post, I present another 1750Hz tone generator which I built using 74HC4060 high-speed 14-stage binary ripple counter and 7.168MHz crystal. In this design, 74HC4060 is used to drive the crystal and divide its output by 4096. By using 7.168MHz crystal, this circuit produces 1750.0Hz square wave output with a 50% duty cycle.

See the full post on his blog.

DIY inline refractometer

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DIY inline refractometer project from Anfractuosity:

The idea of this project is to image the refractometer output, then convert the position of the blue line, to a digital reading, using image processing. The idea is to measure the brix of wort during mash and sparging, so that sparging can be stopped around 1.010 SG, to avoid tannins.

More details on Anfractuosity blog.

Check out the video after the break.

Semiconductor radioactivity detector: part 3

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Robert Gawron has made a new version of his radioactivity detector project and wrote a post on his blog detailing its assembly:

In this post I will present a new hardware version of my sensor, older versions are described in part I and part II. In comparison to the previous one, sensitivity is roughly x10 more sensitive.
In previous version, tin foil window for photodiodes was very close to the BNC sockets and because enclosure was small, it was hard to place a sample close enough. Not it’s better, however, if I would choosing again, I would use metal enclosure similar to those used in PC oscilloscopes and put BNCs on front panel, power socket on rear panel and tin foil window on top. This would allow me to easier access for debugging- now I have to desolder sockets to get to photodiodes or to bottom side of PCB.

See the full post on his blog.

Open Trickler: The DIY smart powder trickler

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Eric Higgins has a nice build log on his Open Trickler project a bluetooth-enabled smart powder trickler from off-the-shelf parts for under $60:

Fundamentally, this is not a hard problem to solve. Read the value from the scale, run a motor that moves powder into the scale, turn off the motor when the scale reads the target weight. As with many projects, the devil’s in the details and there was plenty of trial-and-error during the development process to reach a working prototype.
In this project, a Raspberry Pi is used to read the weight from the scale and run a small vibration motor (like those in mobile phones) to trickle powder. An app on your phone or tablet connects to the Raspberry Pi over Bluetooth, and is used to set the target weight and start/stop the automatic trickling process.

See the full post on Ammolytics blog.

Check out the video after the break.