A development board for an STM32G081 MCU

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Andy Brown designed and built an STM32G081 development board:

I’ve been an avid user of ST’s F0 series ever since it was launched. The 48MHz Cortex M0 is almost always the perfect MCU for every project that I tend to build and it’s so easy to program and debug that, for me, it’s the default answer to ‘which MCU should I use for this project?’ So when I noticed that ST had launched a ‘G0’ range I just had to have a closer look.

See the detailed writeup and download the Gerber files on Andy’s Workshop.

Check out the video after the break.

Development board for PIC16F1938

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Raj over at Embedded Lab has designed a development board for PIC16F1938:

The PIC16F1938 is a versatile 28-pin MCU belonging to Microchip’s extreme low power microcontroller family featuring nanoWatt XLP technology, 28KB of programming memory, 1KB of RAM, 11 ADC channels, and tons of other peripherals. A while ago, I designed a development board for this MCU and I thought it would be worth sharing this design here. The development board features an onboard USB-UART bridge to support the ds30 Loader for easy programming of the PIC MCU. All I/O pins are accessible through 2×5 headers.

Project info at Embedded Lab site.

Atmel SAM D09 Development board

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Dan Watson has designed a development board for the Atmel SAM D09 microcontroller:

The Atmel SAM D series of 32-bit microcontrollers includes several devices, each with a long list of features at great prices. Perhaps the best known of the series in the maker community is the SAM D21 due to its use on the Arduino Zero. However, there are several other devices in the product line that are worth taking a look at. The smallest of the bunch is the SAM D09 that comes in a 14-pin SOIC package. The 14SOIC package is one of my favorites. It is easy to solder, easy to break out on a PCB, and takes up little board space. I decided to order some SAM D09C chips and design a small development board in order to learn more about the capabilities of the device.

Project info at The Sync Channel blog.