PiggyFuse HVSP AVR fuse programmer

PiggyFuse2-600

Nerd Ralph published a new build:

Although I’ve been working with AVR MCUs for a number of years now, I had never made a high voltage programmer.  I’ve seen some HVSP fuse resetter projects I liked, but I don’t have a tiny2313.  I think I was also hesitant to hook up 12V to an AVR, since I had fried my first ATMega328 Pro Mini by accidentally connecting a 12V source to VCC.  However, if you want to be an expert AVR hacker, you’ll have to tackle high-voltage programming.  Harking back to my Piggy-Prog project, I realized I could do something similar for a fuse resetter, which would simplify the wiring and reduce the parts count.

See the full post on his blog here. Code is available at Github.

Attiny85 pogo backpack programmer

ATTINY85 POGO BACKPACK PROGRAMMER

Facelesstech published a new build:

So you are using a bare attiny85 in your next project but don’t have room for the programming header, What do you do? I came up with the idea of using pogo pins layed out on A PCB so that they will sit on top of the Attiny85 legs. I used standard male jumps at each end of the chip to help line it up.

More details on Facelesstech homepage. Project files are available at Github.

Check out the video after the break.

Attiny wearable

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Attiny wearable project from Facelesstech:

It’s a foundation for a wearable platform. It’s a Nato watch strap threaded through a PCB with a coin cell battery holder between the PCB and the strap. I’m using a Attiny85 this time around but could be used for most chips/dev boards. This is a proof of concept to iron out any problems I’ve overlooked.

Project info at Facelesstech’s blog and the GitHub repository here.

Check out the video after the break.

AtPack: Atmel Pack parser, visualizer and fuse calculator

AtPack

 

AtPack – Atmel Pack parser, visualizer and fuse calculator from Vagrearg:

Looking for an up-to-date fuse-calculator for the Atmel(*) AVR chips has been something of a long search. There are several online versions, but they have not been updated to the new chips (like the ATmega328PB).
When you have got an itch, you simply scratch it… Don’t you?
Well, I did, and it resulted in an analysis of the Atmel Pack format, which can be freely downloaded under an Apache 2.0 license. The AtPacks contain a master XML file with device lists and links to each device’s XML file, which in turn describes the entire chip. The format is not that hard to understand and can be easily mangled into something useful. Then, some crude jQuery hacking and many hours later… you know how that works.

Code is at GitHub and there is an online version.

Via Vagrearg.

‘Daytime Running Light’ module (DRL) with ATtiny85

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Nicu Florica writes:

A reader of my sites and blogs, Mr. Liviu Hinoveanu wanted to replace classical DRL module made with 555 with Attiny85 programmed in Arduino style.
He send me the schematic and PCB designed with Livewire and PCB Wisard software
After I undertand what module must work, I write DRL_ATtiny85.ino sketch.
Mr. Hinoveanu made module and upload sketch in ATiny85 like in article from Programarea unui microcontroler ATTiny85 cu sketch Arduino.

See the full post on his blog, Arduinotehniq.

Check out the video after the break.

 

Attiny85 backpack programmer header

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Facelesstech published a new build:

So when I was into using just a atmega328 dip chip I make a programmer header for it that also had a crystal and the capacitors need to make it function. I wanted to do the same for the attiny85. As you know you have to use a ISP programmer to flash the attiny85, This requires you to look up the pinouts and get a bunch of jumps out to wire it up. I wanted to eliminate all of this.

More details at Facelesstech site. Github link here.

Check out the video after the break.

PS2-TTLserial adapter for RC2014 and MIDI

PS2-to-ttlserial-midi-600

Dr. Scott M. Baker published a new build:

The original reason for this project is that I wanted to build a standalone RC2014 with keyboard and display. There is an official RC2014 serial keyboard, but I find it a little inconvenient for my big fingers and poor eyesight. I have plenty of old PS/2 keyboards laying around, so I figured I’d rig up a microcontroller to convert the PS/2 keyboard interface into a TTL-level serial interface that could be plugged directly into the RC2014’s serial port.
Along the way, I discovered that the very same circuit would make an interesting project to turn a PS/2 keyboard into a simple MIDI controller. So I adapted the circuit for that purpose as well.

See the full post on his blog.

Check out the video after the break.