Atari 5200 Playstation 2 dual-shock controller adapter

5200-ps2-built

Dr. Scott Baker has developed an adapter that allows you to use Playstation 2 analog controllers on an Atari 5200, that is available on gitHub:

This adapter allows you to use a PS2 controller on an Atari 5200 gaming console. The 5200 was notable at the time for its use of analog joysticks, but the controllers that shipped with the console are pretty lousy. They don’t self-center and they have a mushy annoying feel to them. The fire buttons aren’t very tactile in nature. The controller in my opinion just doesn’t feel or work good. Nevertheless, you have to give the Atari 5200 some respect for trying to be a pioneer in the technology.
As such, several solutions have been proposed for using alternate controllers. There are adapters for Atari 2600 digital sticks, adapters for analog PC joysticks, my own handheld controller, etc. I decided to adapt the basic technique of my handheld controller to a PS2 adapter.

See the full post on Dr. Scott M. Baker’s blog.

Homemade Atari 5200 analog controller

atari-5200-homemade-controller-complete

Dr. Scott M. Baker made a custom controller for the Atari 5200 vintage gaming console, that is available on Github:

I decided to make my own Atari 5200 analog controller, using a sparkfun thumbstick together with ADC and digital pot to do the potentiometer scaling. The controller is aesthetically a bit rough, consisting of a pcboard mounted to a chunk of hardboard, but it’s fully functional. I also recommend Ben Heck’s “Atari 5200: Making a Better Controller” video.

Project info at smbaker.com.

Check out the video after the break.

 

 

Pi-powered Atari 5200 multi-ROM cartridge (MultiCart)

pi-atari-board

Dr. Scott M. Baker has a nice write-up about building a multi-ROM cartridge for his Atari 5200 using Raspberry Pi:

The Atari 5200 is a vintage gaming system from the early 1980s. At the time I owned a 2600, but I always wanted a 5200. Well, in 2018 I finally decided to find one on eBay and buy it. I learned that the first thing you want to do after attaining a new gaming console is to get your hands on every available game cartridge for it, so I made this multi-ROM cartridge.
A multi-ROM cartridge, or “MultiCart” is a cartridge that contains more than one ROM image. There are multiple ways to go about this from selector switches to pick the cartridge you want, to built-in in game menu systems. I decided to go the route of using a Raspberry Pi for the user interface, making a WEB UI available to pick which cartridge is used.
The goal is not simply to play retro games on modern hardware — there’s any number of emulation solutions for that. The goal is to play retro games on retro hardware, but use a modern system to load the game image into the console.

See the full post at smbaker.com and the GitHub repository here.

Check out the video after the break.