Simple NTP clock using USB display module

IMG_20190707_080953-600

Dilshan Jayakody writes:

Simple NTP clock is a maintenance-free clock application developed to work on single-board computers like Raspberry Pi, Orange Pi, etc. This clock application uses the Simple Network Time Protocol (SNTP) to get the time and display it on seven segment display which I designed.  This application is designed to work on most of the Linux based systems and had minimum dependencies with system libraries and peripherals. I developed this application to work with Allwinner H2 Plus based Orange Pi Zero board, but this can compile for other platforms without doing any modifications on the source code.

See the full post on his blog.

USB seven segment display module

DSC_0027-small

Dilshan Jayakody published a new build:

This project is about an open source, USB based, 10 digit seven segment display unit. This unit is specifically designed to work with POS systems and banking applications. Initially, this system is developed to work with PC based systems, and later it was modified to work with other platforms and applications.

See the full post on his blog.

New NXP MCUXpresso Eclipse IDE v11.0

nxp-mcuxpresso-ide-v11.0.0

New NXP MCUXpresso Eclipse IDE v11:

The V11 of the MCUXpresso IDE is again a big step forward: new Eclipse version and 64bit, updated ARM toolchain, extended debugging support for P&E and Segger in addition to the LinkServer connection. The Global Variables view now supports live variables and graphing for P&E and SEGGER in addition to the LinkServer connection. The new views with the Build Analysis, Image Info, Stack usage and Call Analysis are very useful. And for bare metal applications it includes a heap and stack usage view too.

More details on MCU on Eclipse.

Remote debugging with USB based JTAG/SWD debug probes

ip-based-debugging-with-usb-debug-probe

Erich Styger wrote an article on how to turn a USB debug probe into a IP-based debug solution:

For some projects it is not possible to have the device under debug available on my desk: the board might be in another room, on another site or in a place where physical access is not possible or even dangerous. In that case an IP-based debug probe (see Debugging ARM Cores with IP based Debug Probes and Eclipse) is very useful: as long as I can access its IP address, that works fine. It is an excellent solution even if the board is moving or rotating: hook it up to a WLAN access point and I still can use it as it would be on my desk.

More details on MCU on Eclipse homepage.

Tutorial: Booting the NXP i.MX RT from Micro SD card

sd-card-with-i.mx-rt1052

Erich Styger has written an article on how to boot the NXP i.MX RT from Micro SD card:

It is a common thing to boot a Linux system (see the Raspberry Pi) from a micro SD card. It is not that common for a microcontroller. The NXP i.MX RT ARM Cortex-M7 fills that gap between these two worlds. No surprise that it features a ROM bootloader which can boot from a micro SD card.
Booting from a SD card is kind of cool: load a new software to the card, insert it and boot from it. In some applications this can be very useful: in my configuration the processor starts the ROM bootloader, then loads the image from the SD card into RAM and then runs it. In that configuration no internal or external FLASH memory would be needed.

Via MCU on Eclipse.

Viewing ARM CPU activity in real time

viewing_cpu2-600

Jeremy Bentham writes:

In previous blog posts, I have described how an FTDI USB device can be programmed in Python to access the SWD bus of an ARM microprocessor. This allows the internals of the CPU to be accessed, without disrupting the currently running program.
In this blog I take the process one step further, and add a graphical front-end, that shows the CPU activity in real time

More details on Iosoft blog. Source files are available on GitHub.

Regaining debug access of NXP i.MX RT1064-EVK executing WFI

i.MX-RT1064-EVK-Boar

Erich Styger writes:

Working with low power modes can be challenging. It can severely affect debugging capabilities of a microprocessor or microcontroller. I ported a FreeRTOS application using the Tickless Idle Mode to the NXP i.MX RT1064 board, and all of a sudden, the board was unresponsive to any debugger connection. Luckily the board was not really bricked, but it took me while to find a way to recover it. So for when you end up in a situation with a ‘bricked’ i.MX RT1064 board, this article might be helpful for you to recover it.

More details on MCU on Eclipse blog.

The ARM chip that wont cost an arm and a leg

2018-09-18T16 25 43.036Z-board

A small ARM developmentboard from SMDprutser, that is available on GitHub:

Searching the prerequisite Chinese websites to satisfy my shopping fetish I came across a neat little ARM Cortex-M0 chip which is an extremely good bang for buck. I believe it is the smallest chip available in a reasonable hand-solderable package (TSOP8). This board gives you everything to explore this marvel of this Chinese Semiconductor.

Project info at smdprutser.nl. It’s also up on Tindie.

Building a USB bootloader for an STM32

BootloaderEntryandExit

Kevin Cuzner writes:

As my final installment for the posts about my LED Wristwatch project I wanted to write about the self-programming bootloader I made for an STM32L052 and describe how it works. So far it has shown itself to be fairly robust and I haven’t had to get out my STLink to reprogram the watch for quite some time.
The main object of this bootloader is to facilitate reprogramming of the device without requiring a external programmer.

More details on Projects & Libraries’ homepage.

STM32F103 vs GD32F103 round 4: SPI master

part4_gd_vs_stm-1080x675-600

Sjaak writes, “This is part 4 in the series where we compare the STM32F103 with its Chinese counterpart the GD32F103. Both are ARM Cortex M3 microcontrollers which are mostly pin, peripheral and register compatible. Now we compare the SPI master peripheral of both chips.”

More details at smdprutser.nl.

Check out the video after the break.