Neopixel clock, v2

Neopixel Clock

David Zweben published a project writeup showing how he built a Neopixel clock powered by an Arduino Pro Mini clone and a real time clock module:

After building my first Neopixel Clock, I decided I needed one for myself. There was no way I was going to solder 90 lengths of wire onto 180 tiny pads again, though, so I knew I needed to design a custom PCB. This necessitated a redesign of the entire clock, focused around making it as easy as possible to assemble.

Project info at zweben.org.

Check out the video after the break.

 

5 LDO regulator considerations other than voltage and current

Pryamiduino-R4-with-LDO-Regulator-Disabled-1600px-760x427

James Lewis over at Bald Engineer writes, “For an AddOhms series, I created a DIY Arduino I am calling the “Pyramiduino.” It is an ATmega328p based board in the shape of a triangle. Other than being cute, the shape does not offer any other benefit. The design features a 3.3 volt LDO Regulator, which is also the subject of this post.”

More details on Baldengineer’s tutorial page.

Arduino time attendance system with RFID

circuit-600

A how-to on building a time attendance system with MFRC522 RFID Reader and Arduino from Random Nerd Tutorials:

Before getting started it’s important to layout the project main features:
*It contains an RFID reader that reads RFID tags;
*Our setup has a real time clock module to keep track of time;
*When the RFID reader reads an RFID tag, it saves the current time and the UID of the tag in an SD card;
*The Arduino communicates with the SD card using an SD card module;
*You can set a check in time to compare if you are in time or late;
*If you are on time, a green LED lights up, if you are late, a red LED lights up;
*The system also has a buzzer that beeps when a tag is read.

More details at randomnerdtutorials.com.

Check out the video after the break.

Adding the Nokia 5110 LCD to your Arduino data logger

From the comments on our ChipKIT based weather station using BME280 sensor module post, Edward Mallon writes:

A lot of us have ended up at this sensor / screen combination. But I couldn’t afford the extravagance of six dedicated control lines on our little pro mini based loggers.
However with some slight modification, you can drive the Nokia 5110 LCD with only 3 control lines, and power the display from a digital pin

More details thecavepearlproject.org.

Rombus pinball – a LattePanda mini pinball machine

rombus-pinball

Matt Brailsford (aka Circuitbeard) has a nice write-up about building his mini pinball machine with a lattepanda core running dual monitors:

I generally start my projects by thinking about the hardware that I’m going to want to use as I’ll need to know sizes when it comes to the design phase. My first thought was to go with a Rasberry Pi as it’s what I’m familiar with and it’s what I’ve used for my other arcades, but after looking online, there really didn’t seem to be any good options for pinball emulation on Linux at all. It all seemed to be windows based. Thankfully I remembered reading about a single board Windows computer called a LattePanda so I thought why not give that a go and so this was the approach I ended up taking.

Build log at Circuitbeard blog and the GitHub repository here.

Check out the video after the break.

Attiny85 pogo backpack programmer

ATTINY85 POGO BACKPACK PROGRAMMER

Facelesstech published a new build:

So you are using a bare attiny85 in your next project but don’t have room for the programming header, What do you do? I came up with the idea of using pogo pins layed out on A PCB so that they will sit on top of the Attiny85 legs. I used standard male jumps at each end of the chip to help line it up.

More details on Facelesstech homepage. Project files are available at Github.

Check out the video after the break.

ESP8266 SPI Spy

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nop head writes:

I came across a very useful post by Thomas Scherrer that describes how to read data from a Peacefair PZEM-021 energy meter by spying on the SPI bus with an Arduino. I decided to do the same thing with an ESP-12F WiFi module so that I could view the results remotely and plot graphs, etc. It took me a lot longer to get this working than I anticipated due to a few problems along the way.
The main hardware difference is the ESP8266 is a 3.3V device but the Arduino is 5V. The PZEM-021 is actually a mixture. The RN8208G metering chip is a 5V device. It is a SPI slave, the SPI master is an STM32 ARM processor that is 3.3V but with 5V tolerant inputs.

More details at HydraRaptor blog.

How servo motors work and how to control servos using Arduino

p-Arduino-and-PCA9685-PWM-Servo-Driver-600

Dejan Nedelkovski over at HowToMechatronics shared detailed tutorial on how servo motors work and how to control servos using Arduino and PCA9685 PWM driver:

There are many types of servo motors and their main feature is the ability to precisely control the position of their shaft. A servo motor is a closed-loop system that uses position feedback to control its motion and final position.
In industrial type servo motors the position feedback sensor is usually a high precision encoder, while in the smaller RC or hobby servos the position sensor is usually a simple potentiometer. The actual position captured by these devices is fed back to the error detector where it is compared to the target position. Then according to the error the controller corrects the actual position of the motor to match with the target position.
In this tutorial we will take a detailed look at the hobby servo motors. We will explain how these servos work and how to control them using Arduino.

More details at HowToMechatronics.

Check out the video after the break.

 

Nui (IR volume controller)

 

nui_v1p0-600

Alvaro Prieto made an IR volume controller and wrote a post on his blog detailing its assembly:

Nui is an IR controlled volume controller for analog audio. It sits between your audio source and speakers and can amplify or reduce the volume using IR commands (and eventually BLE).
Why do I need this?
It all started because I have my trusty Logitech Z-2300 speakers and subwoofer I purchased back around 2004/5. They still work great, but instead of being on my computer, they are used for my TV. Unfortunately, the TV’s line out doesn’t honor the TV’s volume and is always outputting at max volume. Sure, I can get up and change the volume on the speakers themselves, but wouldn’t it be more convenient to do it with the TV remote?!
That’s how the Nui project started. It sits between my TV and my speakers and now I don’t have to get up to change the volume :D

See the full post on his blog and on GitHub:

Traktorino, an open source DIY MIDI controller

Traktorino

Here’s an Arduino based open source MIDI controller by Musico Nerd, the Traktorino:

The Traktorino is a powerful low-cost DIY MIDI Controller. It is based in the Arduino platform and it comes in DIY kit, or assembled. In its core, there’s a shield that connects to an Arduino Uno, which uses open-source code, making it totally hackable.
The Traktorino is a MIDI class compliant device, designed for controlling Traktor. It has several features and custom made mappings, so you can take the most of the software. However, it can do much more than that. The Traktorino can control any software that accepts MIDI, like Ableton Live, Serato, FL Studio, Logic, etc

More info at musiconerd.com and on GitHub.

Check out the video after the break.