App note: Overture series high power solutions

Overture Application Note AN-1192

This application note (PDF) from TI discusses the different aspects of the Overture series high-power solutions, and discusses three application circuits: parallel, bridged, and bridged/parallel configurations

The objective is to provide simple high-power solutions that are conservatively designed, highly reliable and have low part count. This document provides three specific, but not unique, application circuits that provide output power of 100W, 200W,
and above. These circuits are the parallel, bridged, and bridged/parallel configurations.
These three circuits are simple to understand, simple to build and require very few external components compared
to discrete power amplifier designs. Simplicity of design and few components make this solution much more reliable than discrete amplifiers. In addition, these circuits inherently possess the full protection of each individual IC that is very difficult and time consuming to design discretely. Finally, these circuits are well know and have been in industry for years.

App note: IC temperature sensor accuracy compensation with a PIC microcontroller

IC temperature sensor accuracy compensation with a PIC microcontroller

This application note is based on the analog output MCP9700/MCP9701 and serial output MCP9800 temperature sensors. Link (PDF)  here

Microchip Technology Inc. provides a number of analog and serial output Integrated Circuit (IC) temperature sensors. Typically, these sensors are accurate at room temperature within one degree Celsius (±1°C). However, at hot or cold temperature extremes, the accuracy decreases nonlinearly. Normally, that nonlinearity has a parabolic shape.

App note: Parallel crystal circuit input voltage control

Parallel Crystal Circuit Input Voltage Control

This application note is intended for use with all SMSC LAN products incorporating a parallel crystal circuit. The information contained in this application note provides one option to control the voltage across the input of the crystal circuitry. Link here

The designer should incorporate the series resistor shown below in his design to guarantee that the specified device maximum input voltage levels are not exceeded. It is the responsibility of the designer to ensure that all input voltages in his entire design do not exceed the recommended voltage levels in the applicable data sheet. It is strongly recommended to utilize all design suggestions from SMSC and then verify the operation of the circuit in a lab environment. Verification includes measuring all input waveforms with an oscilloscope to ensure proper voltage levels.

App note: USB hardware design guide

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An app note from Silicon Labs with design guidelines for implementing USB host and device applications using USB capable EFM32 microcontrollers. Link here. (PDF!)

This document will explain how to connect the USB pins of an EFM32 microcontroller, and will give general guidelines on PCB design for USB applications. First some quick rules-of-thumb for routing and layout are presented before a more detailed explanation follows.
The information in this document is meant to supplement the information already presented in Energy Micro application notes AN0002 Hardware Design Considerations and AN0016 Oscillator Design Considerations, and it is recommended to follow these guidelines as well.

App note: Simple Switcher PCB layout guidelines

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Simple Switcher PCB layout guidelines from Texas Instruments, app note here (PDF!)

One problem with writing an application report on PCB layout is that the people who read it are usually not the ones who are going to use it. Even if the designer has struggled through electromagnetic fields, EMC, EMI, board parasitics, transmission line effects, grounding, and so on, he will in all probability then go on with his primary design task, leaving the layout to the CAD/layout person. Unfortunately, especially when it comes to switching regulators, it is not enough to be concerned with just basic routing/connectivity and mechanical issues. Both the designer and the CAD person need to be aware that the design of a switching power converter is only as good as its layout. Which probably explains why a great many of customer calls received, concerning switcher applications, are ultimately traced to poor layout practices.
Sadly, these could and should have been avoided on the very first prototype board, saving time and money on all sides.

App note: IR remote control transmitter

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IR remote control transmitter application note (PDF!) from Microchip:

This application note illustrates the use of the PIC10F206 to implement a two-button infrared remote controller. The PIC10F2XX family of microcontrollers is currently the smallest in the world, and their compact sizes and low cost make them preferable for small applications such as this one.
Two example protocols are shown. The first is Philips® RC5, and the second is Sony™ SIRC. These two protocols were chosen because they are fairly common and their formats are well documented on professional and hobbyists’ web sites. They also demonstrate two differing schemes for formatting the transmission.

App note: Using the Configurable Logic Cell (CLC) to interface a PIC16F1509 and WS2811 LED driver

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An application note (PDF!) from Microchip on how to use CLC to interface a PIC16F1509 and WS2811 LED driver:

The Configurable Logic Cell (CLC) peripheral in the PIC16F1509 device is a powerful way to create custom interfaces that would otherwise be very difficult. One example is the single-wire PWM signal, used by the WS2811 LEDs, well known in LED video display systems. This application note will provide a simple demonstration of a WS2811 LED Strip driver.

App note: Infrared remote control implementation with MSP430FR4xx

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Infrared remote control implementation with MSP430FR4xx application note from TI:

This application report provides an insight into several of the most frequently used infrared protocols and especially their flexible implementation using the TI MSP430FR4xx series of low-power microcontrollers.
The MSP430FR4xx microcontrollers are primarily targeted at remote control application that are equipped with infrared modulation function and an LCD display. The infrared modulation combinatory logic works with rich peripheral resources (for example, timers, RTC, WDT, and SPI) to generate infrared waveforms for transmitting infrared signals with minimal software overhead and intelligent power consumption.