App note: Overcurrent protection with Thin Film resistors technology

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A technical note about Thin Film fuses from Vishay. Link here (PDF)

Thin film technology is an established technology for high-grade passive components, which has been proved and refined over decades. Its advantages in terms of accuracy, repeatability and stability are appreciated in mass production for billions of thin film resistors every year. Chip fuses produced in thin film technology now deliver similarly predictable properties in terms of the stability and repeatability of the fusing characteristic. With this proven technology embodied in next-generation safety devices for overcurrent protection, power electronics designers can achieve higher levels of safety and performance in new product designs.

App note: Interfacing to analog switches: Driving the control input of an analog switch with 1.8 V or lower − Is it safe?

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ON Semiconductor’s analog switches let you drive with an input control voltage lower than Vcc. Link here (PDF)

Analog switches are everywhere today. Due to their small size and low current consumption, they are popular in portable devices where they are effective in a variety of subsystems including audio and data communications, port connections, and even test. They can be used to facilitate signal routing, allow multiple data types to share an interface connector, or permit temporary access to internal processors during manufacturing. Analog switches are often used to give portable system designers a convenient method of increasing their features or accessibility without duplicating any circuitry. Understanding the key specifications and tradeoffs can make the difference between a temporary fix and a truly optimized solution.

App note: Consideration of self-pollution reduction for electronic systems

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App note from ON Semiconductors discussing how locally generated EMI affects its own system and how to prevent it. Link here (PDF)

This application note will address the problem of Electro Magnetic Interference (EMI) self pollution in which one part of an electrical systems such as cell phones and consumer electrical products emit radiation that interferes with the operation of other parts of the system.

App note: Active capacitor discharge circuit considerations for FPGAs

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Power down sequencing and discharging on FPGAs app note from Diodes Incorporated. Link here (PDF)

FPGA’s need the different power rails to be powered up and down in a defined sequence. For power down, each sequenced rail needs to be fully off before the next rail is turned off. With large high speed and high functionality FPGA’s, the power rails have large bulk capacitors to be discharged quickly and safely within a total time of 100ms and up to 10 rails each to be discharged within 10ms.

This application note shows a methodology and considerations for safe open ended shutdown to be controlled by a power sequencing circuit and using correctly chosen MOSFET to discharge the capacitor bank.

App note: Power supply rejection for low-jitter clocks

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Method of rejecting noises from power supply, an app note from Silicon Labs. Link here (PDF)

Hardware designers are routinely challenged to increase functional density while shrinking the overall PCB footprint of each new design. One significant challenge is minimizing clock jitter through careful board design while meeting the design’s functional and space requirements. Since jitter is a measure of signal fidelity, it requires an understanding of diverse analog concepts, such as transmission line theory, interference, bandwidth, and noise, in order to manage their impact on performance. Among these, density impacts sensitivity to external noise and interference the most. Since noise and interference are everywhere and since multiple components share a common power supply, the power supply is a direct path for noise and interference to impact the jitter performance of each device. Therefore, achieving the lowest clocking jitter requires careful management of the power supply. Sensitivity to power supply is commonly referred to as power supply ripple rejection or power supply rejection ratio (PSRR). For jitter, ripple rejection is more appropriate.

App note: Automotive reverse battery protection diode

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Super Barrier Rectifier™ (SBR) from Diodes Incorporated offers good power efficiency compared to normal PN junction diode and design simplicity compared to MOSFETs reverse protection. Link here (PDF)

This application note compares the performance of Diodes Inc. Super Barrier Rectifier™ (SBR) as an automotive reverse battery protection diode with other solutions. An overview of the reverse battery protection requirement and the qualification standards are also presented.

App note: A closer look at LVDS technology

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A general overview of Low Voltage Differential Signaling (LVDS) from Diodes incorporated. Link here (PDF)

With the increase in demand for high throughputs, current technologies are becoming less efficient. Data transmission devices like RS-422, RS-485, SCSI and other devices are limited in data rate and power dissipation. With LVDS, data rate has increased tremendously to meet the demand in the high bandwidth market and yet still consumes less power than many current devices. LVDS offers low-power. low-noise coupling, low EMI emissions, and switching capability beyond many current standards. LVDS applications can be used anywhere where high data rate is required and needed to be transfer over a distance. LVDS technology can be found in printers, flat panels, switches, routers, audio/video digital signal processing and many more other applications.

App note: iCoupler® Isolation in CAN bus applications

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Application note from Analog Devices on CAN bus system isolation. Link here (PDF)

The intention of this application note is to give the user a brief overview of the CAN bus protocol, focusing on the system physical layer, as well as an understanding of why isolation is so important to the system. This application note also details how to implement isolation in a CAN bus system using Analog Devices’ iCoupler products.