Build your very own drink mixing robot

Yu Jiang Tham designed and built his own bartender robot named Bar Mixvah, that is available on Github:

I built a robot that mixes drinks named Bar Mixvah.  It utilizes an Arduino microcontroller switching a series of pumps via transistors on the physical layer, and the MEAN stack (MongoDB, Express.js, Angular.js, Node.js) and jQuery for the frontend and backend.  In this post, I’ll teach you how I made it.  You can follow along and build one just like it!

Check out Yu Jiang’s 3-part blog post here: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3.

3D scanning like a pro

3D scanning like a pro

Saulius Lukse writes, “Almost any sensor yields more interesting results if mounted on a moving platform. It’s time to mount TOF LIDAR on two precision rotary stages arranged for pan and tilt operation. Rig provides real-time position data along with distance to an obstacle. Using simple math we can calculate position in Cartesian coordinate system. Data is collected point by point to reconstruct 3D object model. After 3D reconstruction and colorizing in MeshLab I got amazing result of my room.”

More details at Kurokesu blog.

Via the contact form.

All Your Displays Are Belong to Us

Artist and Hackaday reader [Blair Neal] wrote in with his incredible compendium of “alternative” displays. (Here as PDF.) From Pepper’s Ghost to POV, he’s got it all covered, with emphasis on their uses in art.

There’s an especially large focus on 3D displays. Projecting onto screens, droplets of water, spinning objects, and even plasma combustion are covered. But so are the funny physical displays: flip-dots, pin-cushions, and even servo-driven “pixels”.

Flavien Théry’s La Porte 
Flavien Théry’s La Porte

We really liked the section on LCDs with modified polarization layers — we’ve seen some cool hacks using that gimmick, but the art pieces he dredged up look even better. Makes us want to take a second look at that busted LCD screen in the basement.

We’re big fans of the bright and blinky, so it’s no surprise that [Blair] got a bunch of his examples from these very pages. And we’ve covered [Blair]’s work as well: both his Wobbulator and his “Color a Sound” projects. Hackaday: your one-stop-shop for freaky pixels.

[Blair]’s list looks pretty complete to us, but there’s always more out there. What oddball displays are missing? What’s the strangest or coolest display you’ve ever seen?


Filed under: misc hacks

An open source 3D Scanner made with Raspberry Pi

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Boris Landoni from Open Electronics writes about a new open source 3D Scanner made with Raspberry Pi:

This being said, we may move on to talk about our 3D scan approach, that consists in using a linear laser, that is, one capable of drawing a vertical line having a constant luminous intensity, and in shooting the images that have been determined by the light’s reflection on the object’s surface (that in this case is rotated) by means of a video camera; at each rotation degree (or fraction) corresponds a frame that is digitized and sent to a program capable of processing the surface of the scanned object. Usually, in these systems two lasers (tilted with respect to each other) are used, and the video camera is placed between the two. Our scanner is born out of an elaboration of the PiClop, an open project composed of a mechanics (whose parts to be 3D printed may be downloaded from thingiverse ) and of an electronics formed of the Raspberry Pi 2 board and its video camera; PiClop, as implied by the name, is a free interpretation, based on Ciclop’s Raspberry Pi 2 , a 3D commercial laser scanner and a video camera, supplied with a rotating plate.

Full details at Open Electronics project page.

More Delta printer upgrades: WiFi and silence!

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David Crocker has been working on his Delta 3D printer project:

After performing this upgrade, the printer is much quieter than before. This is because of the change from x16 microstepping on the Duet with A4982 drivers, to interpolated x256 microstepping on the Duet WiFi with TMC2660 drivers. The noisiest component is now the 40mm electronics cooling fan under the bed. I shall search for a quieter 40mm 24V fan, or perhaps do a small redesign of the electronics rear panel to use a slower-running 50mm or 60mm fan instead.
Another benefit of the upgrade is that I can now use the printer in a different room – as I occasionally need to do when hosting meetings – without needing to run a communications cable to it. The gcode file upload speed over WiFi is about 800 kbytes per second, similar to the speed I was previously getting with wired Ethernet on the Duet 0.8.5.

Full details at David Crocker’s Solutions blog.

Check out the video after the break.