App note: Receiving S/PDIF audio stream with the STM32F4/F7/H7 series

an_stm_DM00431633

App note from STMicroelectronics about electrically connecting an external S/PDIF stream to an STM32 with an S/PDIFRX interface peripheral, Link here (PDF)

The Sony/Philips Digital Interface Format (S/PDIF) is a point-to-point protocol for serial and uni-directional transmission of digital audio through a single transmission line for consumer and professional applications. The transmission of data can be done in several ways, by electrical or optical means.

The S/PDIFRX peripheral embedded in STM32 devices is designed to receive an S/PDIF flow compliant with IEC-60958 and IEC-61937, which define the physical implementation requirements as well as the coding and the protocol. These standards support simple stereo streams up to high sample rates, and compressed multi-channel surround sound, such as those defined by Dolby or DTS.

App note: Addressing power supply challenges for after-market electronics and infrastructure

Addressing Power Supply Challenges for After-Market Electronics and Infrastructure

This application note discusses key market trends and customer needs that are presenting new challenges for power supply design for after-market technologies and transport infrastructure automation. This piece will also examine solutions to address these challenges, with a special emphasis on power architecture. Link here

After-market automotive products have driven remarkable innovation, from infotainment and telematics to advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS). Features like GPS, rear-view cameras, and parking sensors are now common in vehicles. There is also a continuous rollout of novel after-market technologies being developed by companies worldwide. Fleet management, on-board diagnostics, heads-up display, and freight control/monitoring are just a few examples of technologies found in cars and trucks, trains, ships, avionics, and defense applications.

Wifi based DIY 5V switcher for led-lights

20181116_112356-600

Albert posted a detailed how-to on building DIY ESP-12F based USB-5V switcher:

5V powered 100LED circuit was consuming around ~1.8Watts(though 5.1Ohm series resistor was really hot) and the brightness of the LED’s were not bad, especially difference between first led and last led brightness didnt bother me it was hardly noticeable when seen from distance. So I decided to use them as a christmas decoration for my garden.
I wanted to use them with battery-bank as there was no power-outlet readily available(for the safety of my children, i would avoid any 230v circuit in my garden especially in wet weather). Also I wanted them to be switchable remotely to avoid going out in the freezing cold. Hence this is what i came up with.. an “ESP-12F based USB-5V switcher”

See the full post on his blog.

So how to do CW on a homebrew SSB rig?

IMG_4379

Pete Juliano, N6QW, has written an article on how to do CW on a homebrew SSB rig:

The Answer is Not a Flippant: Carefully!
Author’s note: A friend in VK4 land made an inquiry about CW operation. I find that 99.99% of my operating time is SSB. But others spend a greater time on the air using CW so why not share some info and data that I have stashed on my computer where a SSB rig can be made to work CW. This also open the possibility of filter switching for a more narrow pass band. With Arduino anything may be possible.

More details on Pete Juliano’s (N6QW) blog.

Tiny particle sensor node with decorative case

lucky-resistor-7

Lucky Resistor published a new build:

This article is about a small sensor node with a decorative case. It is based on the Raspberry Pi Zero W board with a custom sensor shield on top.
I publish all hardware files for a simple version of the sensor, so you should be able to build this kind of sensor nodes and use it to monitor anything you like. You can also extend/modify the design easily with additional sensors. Nevertheless, the case lid design is based around the Plantower PMSA003 particle sensor. It has all required air vents for this use.

More details on Lucky Resistor homepage.

App note: Linear regulator problem situations – Power supply does not start

an_rohm_linear_does_not_start

App note from ROHM Semiconductor about various start up problem on 3 pins linear regulator. Link here (PDF)

Although linear regulators can be used to easily configure power supplies, the linear regulators may cause startup problems depending on the type of loads. This application note introduces cases where the power supplies do not start correctly in the linear regulators.

App note: Design considerations for a harsh industrial environment

Design Considerations for a Harsh Industrial Environment

This article discusses factors that influence the robustness of a circuit in a harsh environment, like you would find for industrial applications. The topics covered include ways to handle voltage transients and to protect against electrostatic discharge (ESD) and faults. Link here

Semiconductor (IC) robustness—what is the operating temperature range? How is high electrical noise handled? What about ESD and fault protection? These issues are not necessarily the first things that a design engineer thinks about when selecting an IC. Nonetheless, robustness is a key performance parameter for long-term operation and a reliable, reputable end product. This is especially true when designing a system for an industrial environment where harsh operating conditions are common. Industrial equipment can be exposed to a wide range of temperatures, high electrical noise on either the power-supply lines or data lines, and fault events like ESD or short circuits.

Remote debugging with USB based JTAG/SWD debug probes

ip-based-debugging-with-usb-debug-probe

Erich Styger wrote an article on how to turn a USB debug probe into a IP-based debug solution:

For some projects it is not possible to have the device under debug available on my desk: the board might be in another room, on another site or in a place where physical access is not possible or even dangerous. In that case an IP-based debug probe (see Debugging ARM Cores with IP based Debug Probes and Eclipse) is very useful: as long as I can access its IP address, that works fine. It is an excellent solution even if the board is moving or rotating: hook it up to a WLAN access point and I still can use it as it would be on my desk.

More details on MCU on Eclipse homepage.