WBR-Oscar regen receiver

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A nice write-up on Sheldon’s (N6JJA) version of N1BYT’s WBR regenerative receiver:

This article is broken into two parts. First comes the “Oscar” preselector/preamplifier. As I said, I intended it to be either part of the overall receiver or used as a standalone where desired. The second part deals with the WBR upgrades. Both designs were built using the same techniques and I’ve tested both and found that—especially in concert—they do about as well as some of my boat anchors! So if your soldering iron is ready, I’ll start by describing “Oscar.”

Via Dave Richards AA7EE Blog.

Homebrew SDR HF transceiver

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Simonhk (G0FCU) wrote a series of posts on building homebrew SDR HF transceiver:

However, what you might notice is the presence of image products in the waterfall. The processing of the signal suppresses all but the very strongest of these so they don’t appear as audio but it is mighty confusing when they are on the waterfall but actually not there (if you see what I mean)!
I am in the process of building a QSD or Tayloe Detector, which should provide better rejection of images. I have breadboarded one of these, it works but not very well. I think that this might be due to the length of leads I have on the breadboard so I am trying to use Eagle CAD to design a circuit board to overcome these problems.

Check out the video after the break.

 

Guitar Amp builder notes — AF power amplifier dummy load

DSC_2129-1 (1)Vasily Ivanenko has written an article detailing his AF dummy load project:

I’ll describe a simple 8, or 4 Ω dummy load to test your home brew guitar power amplifiers.
Low cost 16 Ω / 25W wire wound, aluminum shell, chassis mount resistors seem abundant.  I got mine on eBay.  Wire wound resistors vary in quality, design and tolerance. Some even exhibit low inductance by winding with an Ayrton-Perry bifilar technique.  Resistor tolerances range from 10% down to ± 0.5 % + 0.05 Ω.  Typical manufacturer power ratings are done at 25C, however, these devices are meant to sit on a heat sink when used and that’s why the aluminum housing contains 2 relatively large mounting holes.

Project info on QRF HomeBuilder blog.

Building a direct conversion receiver

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Ryan Flowers over at MiscDotGeek posted a how-to on building a direct conversion receiver:

In the first installment of this series, we discussed why we’re building a Direct Conversion receiver and talked about some basic ideas. In this installment, we explore what it takes to make the leap from a printed schematic to something physical that works. Follow along!

More details at MiscDotGeek.com.

App note: Ambient light sensor SFH5701

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App note from OSRAM on their ALS device SFH5701, its operation and application method. Link here (PDF)

The SFH5701 is a small, two-wire, linear output current ambient light sensor (ALS) with current amplifier and dark current compensation. The ALS is capable of resolving a wide range of ambient light levels (10 mlx – 10 klx) tailored to the spectral response of the human eye and operational from -40 °C to 100 °C.

Teensy 3.6 as standalone mediator between USB MIDI and Eurorack

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Sebastian writes:

USB MIDI controllers (such as Launchpad Mini Mk II for example) are common and often quite low in cost.
To interface such a controller with a Eurorack synth system, often a host computer and a MIDI to CV interface might be used. The host computer would take USB MIDI data from the MIDI controller, perhaps store and manipulate that data in some way (e.g. a sequence), using a MIDI to CV converter to then control a Eurorack synth system.
It would be useful to use USB MIDI controllers with Eurorack synth systems without needing a computer and MIDI to CV interface in between the two.
Teensy 3.6 is a great microcontroller that can be programmed using the Arduino IDE. A very useful feature of the Teensy 3.6 is the USB host port.

See the full post on his blog here, Little-Scale.

Check out the video after the break.

New 2.5D pen/laser ESP32 controller

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Bdring published a new build:

I have done several pen and laser machines lately, so I decided to create a custom PCB for Grbl_ESP32 for these types of machines. This is a small (70mm x 60mm) PCB with all the features a pen plotter or laser cutter/engraver would need.
These typically use stepper motors for the X and Y axes. On pen plotters, the Z axis is controlled by a servo or solenoid. On lasers you need an accurate PWM for laser power control.

Project info at Buildlog.Net blog and the library GitHub repository here. It’s also up on Tindie.