Build an ESP8266 web server – Code and schematics (NodeMCU)

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A detailed instructions of how to build an ESP8266 Web Server using NodeMCU firmware:

This tutorial is a step-by-step guide that shows how to build a standalone ESP8266 Web Server that controls two outputs (two LEDs). This ESP8266 NodeMCU Web Server is mobile responsive and it can be accessed with any device with a browser in your local network.

Via Random Nerd Tutorials.

Check out the video after the break.

Simple DataFlash board

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David Johnson writes:

This is a small board that plugs into one of the headers on an Arduino Uno or other board to provide 4Mbytes of non-volatile storage
It works with either 5V or 3.3V boards, and is based on the low-cost 4Mbyte Winbond W25Q32FVSIG DataFlash chip. It is ideal for applications such as data logging, playing audio samples, and storing text.
I also describe a simple DataFlash library to interface to the board.

More details on Technoblogy.

App note: Comparison of LED circuits

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Another application note from OSRAM on different LED circuit design failure mode. Link here (PDF)

In recent years, Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) have become a viable alternative to conventional light sources. The overriding advantages long life, high efficiency, small size and short reaction time have lead to the displacement, in ever increasing numbers, of incandescent bulbs. One of the markets where this change has become most evident is Automotive, where LEDs are used now not only for backlighting dashboards and switches, but also for exterior illumination in Center High Mounted Stop Lights (CHMSL), Rear Combination Lamps (RCL), turn signals and puddle lighting.

Despite the long life and low failure rates of LEDs, cars can be found, on occasion, with failed LEDs in their CHMSL. Most often this is due to a flawed circuit design wherein the LEDs were allowed to be overdriven. It is with that supposition in mind that this application note is written: to identify, characterize and comment on LED behavior and failure modes in serial and matrix circuits.

App note: Dimming LEDs with respect to grouping current

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App note from OSRAM describing the behaviour of LEDs in respect to brightness by varying the current and to suggest solutions for avoiding negative influence for the application. Link here (PDF)

In the design of a driving circuit for LEDs, the dimming behaviour is an important topic to fulfill the end customer requirements. The behaviour of the LEDs in respect to brightness is investigated by varying the current and solutions for avoiding negative influence for the application are suggested.

Building a bluetooth DAC with Raspberry Pi Zero W

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Sami Pietikainen has written an article detailing the build of his Bluetooth DAC using Raspberry Pi Zero W:

My car comes with a built-in Bluetooth hands-free but unfortunately it does not support audio streaming. Luckily there is an AUX input available which uses a regular 3,5 mm jack. Perfect opportunity for a DIY project. I built the Bluetooth DAC using Raspberry Pi Zero W and a DAC hat. This post depicts the details of this project.

See the full post on Page Fault Blog.

Programmable seven segment LED tester

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A Seven segment LED tester project from Arduino Enigma:

Here is the finished Seven Segment Tester. All of the available Arduino Nano pins, except for analog input pins A6,A7 and Serial Port pins D0 and D1 are connected. This leaves us with 18 pins to bring to the 3M Zero Insertion Force (ZIF) socket. Any display up to 9 pin DIP can be tested.
Here are some pictures of the device testing a 16 segment display, a 7 segment display and a 3 digit 7 segment display. The common cathode and common anode versions are programmed as test patterns.
Once the Arduino is programmed, the device can work standalone using a 9v battery.

More details on Arduino Enigma Machine Simulator blog.

Check out the video after the break.

63 dB step attenuator

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DuWayne published a new build:

While I was working on the power meter function for the latest version of the SNA, I used several fixed attenuators for checking linearity and calibration. It would be a lot easier if I had a variable step attenuator. I have several digital controlled attenuator modules that I bought one eBay a while ago, and I guess it is time to use some of them. There are several models available. The ones I plan on using are the simplest with only 6 control pins for a total attenuation of 31.5 dB in .5 dB steps. I am going to connect two in series with the control lines paralleled for a total of 63 dB in 1 dB steps.

See the full post on his blog.

App note: Passive entry door system with proximity sensor

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A full implementation of a keyless entry from Microchip. Link here (PDF)

The door access systems have evolved from simple physical keys to more sophisticated keyless entry systems. Now, we have a system that automatically unlocks the door when user carrying an access key approaches the door handle. As it does not require any user action this system is referred to as Passive Entry