UPDI Programmer Stick

Johnson Davies designed and built this UPDI Programmer Stick based on an ATmega328P, that is available on GitHub:

This is a USB-stick sized UPDI programmer, for programming Microchip’s new 0-series and 1-series ATtiny chips from the Arduino IDE
It’s based on an ATmega328P, and is essentially an Arduino Uno on a USB stick, so you also could use it as a mini-sized Arduino Uno.

Project details at technoblogy.com.

Open source Bluetooth stack for PIC32/24

Nigan tipped us to a simple open source Bluetooth stack for embedded devices, the SmallTooth:

A newly developed open source Bluetooth stack for PIC32/24
* The code is really easy to understand, very well documented and really small.
* Designed to be extended and ported.
* Works straight out of the box with the PIC32 USB Starter Kit II and should be fairly simple to port to other PIC32 or PIC24 boards.

More details on Guillem’s code.google Project Page, Documentation about the stack. Author’s website www.guillem.co.uk

Via the forum. Thanks Nigan!

Single diode temperature sensor with Arduino ICU (& reverse-bias leakage)

Use a single diode as a temperature sensor with Arduino ICU

Our LED light-sensing experiments lead to an interesting observation: When these loggers are left running overnight they still produce readings because reverse-bias ‘leakage-current’ eventually triggers the Interrupt Capture Unit (ICU) – in the absence of any light. The speed of this self-discharge depends on the ambient temperature. If you deliberately cover an rgb LED with heat shrink, the different color channels have different rates of thermal decay

More details on Underwater Arduino Data Loggers blog.

JesFs – Jo’s Embedded Serial File system

suchende tipped us to the small File system for NOR flash:

The main problem for “very small devices” – until now – was the “File System”: everybody knows “FAT”, “NTFS”, … but have you ever thought of a file system on a small chip? Or even inside of a CPU? No problem, with the right Software. This is why I wrote
“JesFs – Jo’s Embedded Serial File System“

Thanks suchende! Via the forum.

Linear Nixie tube HAT for the Raspberry Pi

Mark Smith has been working on a HAT for the Raspberry Pi that can drive two IN-9 or IN-13 linear Nixie tubes:

This project as described in www.surfncircuits.com came about because I needed a retro looking linear meter for my espresso maker water tank. I’m always running out of water in my espresso maker, and a cool display letting me know how much water is left and to let me know when to fill it up is definitely needed. In this project, I’ll create a HAT for the Raspberry Pi that can drive two IN-9 or IN-13 linear Nixie tubes. While I’m using this HAT as a single water meter display, this same linear display would be great for showing temperature, bar graphs, audio VU meters, even surf heights by days of the week. The Nixie Tube Power Supply, designed in an earlier blog will work perfectly to drive up to four of the IN-13 Nixie tubes or one IN-9 Nixie tube.

More details on surfncircuits blog and the GitHub repository here.

Cheaper yet powerful camera solutions

The Landingfield writes:

It’s been a while since my last blog post. During this past year, I’ve built a few other cameras yet released on this blog. In the meantime, I have been looking into options to make this work available to fellow amateur astronomers as a viable product. One major blocker here is the cost. FPGAs are expensive devices due to two factors: 1. They are less produced compared to ASIC and still uses state of art silicon process. 2. Massive area dedicated to routing and configuration logic. Let’s look at a simple comparison. The MicroZed board I’m using cost $200 with dual Cortex-A9 core clocking at 666MHz. This contrasts with quad core Ras Pi 3B clocking at doubling frequency. And it only cost $30.

See the full post on The Landingfield blog.

4 Port high power USB hub

Dilshan Jayakody has published a new build:

In the last couple of years, I tried several powered USB hubs to drive some development boards and USB peripherals. Most of the USB hubs which we can find in the local market are unreliable or not designed to drive more than 500mA of a load.
After having a few bad experiences with powered USB hubs, I decided to build a USB hub by myself. I specifically design this hub to drive USB powered development boards and experimental peripherals.

See the full post on his blog.

JTAG debugging the ESP32 with FT2232 and OpenOCD

Erich Styger has written an article on how to use an inexpensive FTDI evaluation board as JTAG debug interface to debug ESP32 based devices:

In “Eclipse JTAG Debugging the ESP32 with a SEGGER J-Link” I used a SEGGER J-Link to debug an ESP32 device with JTAG. I looked at using one of the FTDI FT2232HL development boards which are supported by OpenOCD. The FT2232HL is dual high-speed USB to UART/FIFO device, and similar FTDI devices are used on many boards as UART to USB converters. With OpenOCD these devices can be turned into inexpensive JTAG debug probes. This article shows how to use a $10 FTDI board as JTAG interface to program and debug the Espressif ESP32.

More details on MCU on Eclipse blog.

A self-expanding ESP32 PWM board

Eric Gunnerson writes:

I’ve been working on a little ESP32 expansion board/shield for an LED project I’ve been working on. One of the nice things about the ESP32 is that it has a peripheral known as “LED control” that provides 16 independent channels of PWM for controlling LED brightness, and my project uses that capability.
One of my projects is going to require all 16 channels, so I wanted to do a board that would support 16 channels, but I also wanted a version of the board that would only support 8 channels.

Project info at Eric’s Arcana and RiderX site. It’s also up on Tindie.

Check out the video after the break.