Guitar Amp builder notes — AF power amplifier dummy load

DSC_2129-1 (1)Vasily Ivanenko has written an article detailing his AF dummy load project:

I’ll describe a simple 8, or 4 Ω dummy load to test your home brew guitar power amplifiers.
Low cost 16 Ω / 25W wire wound, aluminum shell, chassis mount resistors seem abundant.  I got mine on eBay.  Wire wound resistors vary in quality, design and tolerance. Some even exhibit low inductance by winding with an Ayrton-Perry bifilar technique.  Resistor tolerances range from 10% down to ± 0.5 % + 0.05 Ω.  Typical manufacturer power ratings are done at 25C, however, these devices are meant to sit on a heat sink when used and that’s why the aluminum housing contains 2 relatively large mounting holes.

Project info on QRF HomeBuilder blog.

Building a direct conversion receiver

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Ryan Flowers over at MiscDotGeek posted a how-to on building a direct conversion receiver:

In the first installment of this series, we discussed why we’re building a Direct Conversion receiver and talked about some basic ideas. In this installment, we explore what it takes to make the leap from a printed schematic to something physical that works. Follow along!

More details at MiscDotGeek.com.

Arduino Yun, how to update to rev.2

This year in March, Massimo Banzi announced on the Arduino blog the production of a new revision (Rev.2) of the Arduino Yun board.

yun-rev2-001

In addition to some improvements on the hardware design, the new revision offers a complete update of the software side of the Yun, that is the Linux distribution (OpenWrt) running on the board. The original Yun was indeed stuck to a distribution released in 2014 (still available in the download section of Arduino website) and that distribution contained outdated software packages which also presented some security vulnerabilites.

Who now buy a new Yun board, has the new OS version pre-installed. If you own a “Rev.1″ board, in this article you’ll learn how to update it…

Updater

In the Arduino forum, Martino Facchin (one of the contributors of the OpenWrt porting to Yun) published a post with links to an automatic updater for the different platforms (Windows, Linux, Mac). The application updates both the bootloader and the operating system (rootfs). You have to also update the bootloader because of the new OS requires a bigger partition than the original one.

Before running the updater process, there are 3 prerequisites:

  • the Yun board must be connected both to your computer via USB and to your home router/switch using an ethernet cable (the update process cannot happen using wifi)
  • your computer, which runs the updater application, must be connected to the same home network the Yun is connected to
  • your computer must not run softwares (like firewalls) that could block incoming connections

The third point in particular is the one that can give more problems… for example I use the Eset Internet Security suite and I had to temporary disable the protection:

yun-rev2-002

An additional suggestion is to disable other network cards in your computer, keeping active only the one connected to the home network:

yun-rev2-003

If you’re using Windows 10, it may happen that the yun-go-updater.exe program is blocked… in this case you have to cancel the block from the file properties:

yun-rev2-004

If you run the program, the update process should go automatically. When complete, if you connect to the Yun board you should see the new version:

yun-rev2-005

DHCP

During the update process, the Yun board requests a valid IP address for your network using the DHCP protocol. Sometimes this request could fail; in this case you can assign a static IP to the board answering “n” to the first question:

yun-rev2-006

App note: Ambient light sensor SFH5701

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App note from OSRAM on their ALS device SFH5701, its operation and application method. Link here (PDF)

The SFH5701 is a small, two-wire, linear output current ambient light sensor (ALS) with current amplifier and dark current compensation. The ALS is capable of resolving a wide range of ambient light levels (10 mlx – 10 klx) tailored to the spectral response of the human eye and operational from -40 °C to 100 °C.

Teensy 3.6 as standalone mediator between USB MIDI and Eurorack

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Sebastian writes:

USB MIDI controllers (such as Launchpad Mini Mk II for example) are common and often quite low in cost.
To interface such a controller with a Eurorack synth system, often a host computer and a MIDI to CV interface might be used. The host computer would take USB MIDI data from the MIDI controller, perhaps store and manipulate that data in some way (e.g. a sequence), using a MIDI to CV converter to then control a Eurorack synth system.
It would be useful to use USB MIDI controllers with Eurorack synth systems without needing a computer and MIDI to CV interface in between the two.
Teensy 3.6 is a great microcontroller that can be programmed using the Arduino IDE. A very useful feature of the Teensy 3.6 is the USB host port.

See the full post on his blog here, Little-Scale.

Check out the video after the break.

The Khadas Edge: A new captain with an edge // Review

In this review I take a look at one of the newer members of the Khadas family; The Khadas Edge and Khadas Captain.
This board has some pretty interesting power management but, unfortunately, I saw the return of the magic smoke genie. Continue reading The Khadas Edge: A new captain with an edge // Review

The post The Khadas Edge: A new captain with an edge // Review appeared first on MickMake.

New 2.5D pen/laser ESP32 controller

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Bdring published a new build:

I have done several pen and laser machines lately, so I decided to create a custom PCB for Grbl_ESP32 for these types of machines. This is a small (70mm x 60mm) PCB with all the features a pen plotter or laser cutter/engraver would need.
These typically use stepper motors for the X and Y axes. On pen plotters, the Z axis is controlled by a servo or solenoid. On lasers you need an accurate PWM for laser power control.

Project info at Buildlog.Net blog and the library GitHub repository here. It’s also up on Tindie.